Study: High Amounts of Aluminum in Brains of Alzheimer’s Patients

Test tube with blood sample for toxic metals test

by Paul Fassa
Health Impact News

There have been unconfirmed suspicions that aluminum toxicity is at least a factor for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. There seems to be no doubt that aluminum is a neurotoxin, but whether there is an aluminum link to Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, has not been fully explored just recently.

A new study, “Aluminium [British spelling] in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer’s disease” does just that. A pathological brain study of deceased individuals whose bodies were donated by family members. It was conducted in King’s College of London and Keele University of Staffordshire, UK, and published December 2016 in the Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology.

The association of aluminum as a neurotoxin related to several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is often ignored or marginalized even as AD and other neurological disorders continue to rise in epidemic proportions.

This may be due to massive vested interests that use aluminum in ways that depend on its injection into the body or its inadvertent breathing in of nanoparticles.

Alzheimer Aluminum Study Details (more…)

Top 10 Reasons to Eat Your Cruciferous Veggies

10 Reasons to Eat Your Cruciferous Vegetables

Top 10 Reasons to Eat Your Cruciferous Veggies

Everyone knows that eating vegetables has profound health benefits. But, like all foods, not all vegetables are created the same. Some are better than others in terms of nutritional content, and overall contribution to vibrant health. If you look more closely at their phytochemical [plant-based chemical] content, or the growing amount of research into their specific effects on the body and disease, a few vegetables appear to be downright “miracle” foods!

One such group of veggies are those of the Brassica family; commonly known as cruciferous. These include broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, radish, rutabaga, turnip and even arugula.

What makes this group of veggies so special? Sulforaphane.

Sulforaphane is a phytochemical abundant in cruciferous vegetables, and it’s been getting a ton of attention from researchers. But it all starts with glucoraphanin.

Sulforaphane is produced when the enzyme myrosinase converts glucoraphanin, a glucosinolate (natural compound found in some plants), through a chemical reaction induced by damage to the plant, such as cutting or chewing. As such, glucoraphanin is known as the precursor to sulforaphane.

(more…)

Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked To Longer Life

Increased levels of vitamin D are associated with longer telomeres, reported to be a marker of biological aging, says a new study.

© iStock/Dr_Microbe
There are well over 800 references in the medical literature showing vitamin D’s effectiveness–both for the prevention and treatment of cancer.

In the absence of Vitamin D from sunlight, disease increases more than 1000 percent. Experts suggest that the chances of getting vitamin D from your diet are very low. And if you are a vegetarian, it is all the more difficult to gain vitamin D. What they repeatedly suggest is exposure to sunlight is the best source of vitamin D for longevity.

Every 10-nmol increase in levels of 25- hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), the non-active ‘storage’ form of the vitamin) was associated with a 0.03-kbp longer telomere in leukocytes in middle-aged adults, according to data extracted from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002.

(more…)

6 Proven Reasons To Eat The OTHER Black Berry

 6 Proven Reasons To Eat The OTHER Black Berry

Chances are you can find fresh blackberries pretty easily in your local market. But black raspberries (Rubus occidentalis) are a different story.  And they are worth seeking out. 

All berries are good sources of antioxidants but black raspberries take top prize.  According to Oregan State University Department of Food Science and Technology they contain almost three times the antioxidants of blackberries and more than six times the antioxidants of red raspberries.

They are also extremely high in anthocyanins, the antioxidant compounds that give purple foods their rich, unique color.  And they are rich in ellagic acid, a powerful anti-cancer, anti-viral, and anti-bacterial compound.

In a minute you’ll see how to tell a black raspberry from a blackberry in your market.  But first here are six amazing and proven benefits of black raspberries.

1. Blood Pressure

(more…)

Medication-Induced Mitochondrial Damage

drug induced mitochondrial damage

Damage to mitochondria is understood to play a role in the development of a wide range of seemingly unrelated disorders such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and others. Mitochondrial damage is also a hallmark of ME/CFS and Fibromyalgia.

Common causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in ME/CFS and Fibromyalgia are numerous. They include:

  • Dysbiosis
  • Chronic viral infections
  • Metabolic dysfunction (poor insulin control, nutrient depletion)
  • Toxin exposure (metals, mold, other environmental factors)

Another cause of mitochondrial dysfunction that is less frequently mentioned is medication usage. Mitochondrial toxicity testing is NOT required by the FDA before a drug is approved. Medications can hinder mitochondria through direct or indirect mechanisms.

(more…)

Graphic Shows Why You Should Avoid Nutella

Who didn’t love Nutella as a child? That chocolatey smooth texture which spreads so perfectly on any food. Contrary to what its manufacturers promoted for decades, Nutella is not a health food at all. With the exception of margarine, it’s the closest thing to spreadable junk food packed with sugar and one toxic ingredient in particular that has been linked with cancer.


55% of Nutella is sugar based.

Blueberry concentrate improves brain function in older people


Blueberries. The study gave people a daily drink of blueberry concentrate, providing the equivalent of 230g of blueberries.
Credit: © Tim UR / Fotolia

Drinking concentrated blueberry juice improves brain function in older people, according to research by the University of Exeter.

In the study, healthy people aged 65-77 who drank concentrated blueberry juice every day showed improvements in cognitive function, blood flow to the brain and activation of the brain while carrying out cognitive tests.

There was also evidence suggesting improvement in working memory.

Blueberries are rich in flavonoids, which possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

(more…)

Ibuprofen Can Stop Your Heart (31% Increase In Cardiac Arrest Risk)

Ibuprofen Can Stop Your Heart (31% Increase In Cardiac Arrest Risk)

A new study reveals that a commonly consumed painkiller, wrongly considered “harmless” by millions, is probably causing thousands of deaths from cardiac arrest each year.

According to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation, sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of death among adults over 40 in the United States and other countries, with about 326,200 people experiencing an out-of-hospital SCA each year in the US alone; nine of 10 victims of SCA will die.1

Suprisingly, however, the causes of SCA are still widely considered unknown. Instead, the medical profession opts for pointing the finger at vague risk factors, such as family history, previous heart problems, or elevated LDL cholesterol (a long debunked surrogate marker for heart disease].

But what if something so obvious and preventable as the consumption of NSAID drugs could be contributing to this health epidemic?

New Study Reveals Heart-Stopping Side Effects of NSAIDs

(more…)

Broccoli Can Stimulate Brain Regeneration, New Research Suggests

Broccoli Can Stimulate Brain Regeneration, New Research SuggestsFor decades it was believed that brain regeneration was not possible. But an accumulating body of research now reveals that common foods such as broccoli contain compounds capable of stimulating the repair and renewal of nerve tissue.

Ever since Santiago Ramón y Cajal, the father of neuroscience, declared “nothing may be regenerated” in the adult brain, the idea that you can repair or regenerate damaged brain tissue was precluded by this central dogma. But compelling evidence for brain regeneration began to surface in the 1960’s with a report by MIT scientist Joseph Altman that the hippocampus of adult rats and guinea pigs and the cortex of cats indeed underwent a process termed neurogenesis,1  i.e. the growth and development of nervous tissue. (more…)

Latest Perk for Coffee Drinkers: A Boost of Beneficial Enzymes

coffee reduce dementia riskBy Dr. Mercola

A recent study has revealed even more evidence to indicate coffee has more to offer than just a boost of energy. Caffeine offers much more, actually, as it may help protect against the development of dementia.

Researchers at Indiana University discovered that caffeine and 23 other compounds kick-start an enzyme known as nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2, or NMNAT2, and it’s this compound that scientists say may block the effects of neurodegenerative disorders.

To identify substances with the potential to produce the NMNAT2 enzyme in the brain, the scientists screened over 1,280 compounds, including existing drugs, in order to identify 24 compounds that could potentially increase the enzyme’s production.

The study,1 led by Hui-Chen Lu of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, followed research done by Lu’s team in 2016,2 which found that the NMNAT2 enzyme not only protects neurons in the brain from stress but binds to tau proteins via the “chaperone function.”

(more…)