Antidepressants in Pregnancy Tied to Autism

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by ANH-USA.org

A new study provides one more reason to think twice about these powerful drugs, especially if you are pregnant.

After extensive reports showing the negative effects of antidepressants, this new study, which looked at nearly 150,000 babies, has found a link between antidepressants taken during pregnancy and autism in young children. Children of women who took antidepressants during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy were 87% more likely to develop autism than kids born to women who didn’t take the drugs.

This is just the latest reason to be wary of these drugs. We’ve reported previously that there is good evidence to suggest that these mind-altering drugs have played a part in a large percentage of the mass shootings that have occurred in the last few decades. Important research has shown major drugs like Paxil and Prozac to be linked with violence at a substantially higher rate than other drugs—users of Paxil are 10.3 times more likely to do violence to themselves or others, while users of Prozac are 10.9 times more likely to commit those acts. There is not merely an increased risk of suicide, which is now on the label; there is also a dramatically increased risk of violence toward others.

Meanwhile, much safer and more effective natural alternatives are rarely discussed or encouraged, because natural substances cannot be patented and sold at high prices. We’ve reported before about some of these.

Read the full story about the link between antidepressants during pregnancy and autism here.

Read the full article at ANH-USA.org.

http://healthimpactnews.com/2017/antidepressants-in-pregnancy-tied-to-autism/

Study: Coconut Oil’s Lauric Acid Reduces High Blood Pressure

Black tonometer and heart with jar of coconut oil photo isolated on white

by Paul Fassa
Health Impact News

There have been numerous studies on lauric acid for various health supporting factors. Did you know that virgin coconut oil is 50 percent or more lauric acid? So whatever healthy attributes lauric acid contains so does coconut oil, and more.

And more will be explained later in this article. For now we’ll focus on coconut oil’s major component, lauric acid, and a recent animal study with dramatic results discovered for reducing hypertension (high blood pressure) and oxidative stress.

About High Blood Pressure and Oxidative

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Lower High Blood Pressure With More Potassium-Rich Foods, Less Sugar

foods that lower high blood pressure

Story at-a-glance

  • Many believe high blood pressure is caused by consuming too much salt, but studies reveal an imbalance between your sodium intake and your potassium levels may be the problem
  • While processed foods are high in refined sodium, refined sugar is far worse in causing high blood pressure, and the trickle-down effect can also produce metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, stroke and heart attack
  • Leafy greens, crimini mushrooms, avocadoes, blueberries, raw grass fed yogurt and wild-caught Alaskan salmon are all foods you can eat to naturally lower your blood pressure levels due to these foods’ high potassium content
  • Relaxing, deep breathing, walking, regular exercise and losing weight are all ways you can lower your blood pressure levels and improve your overall health

By Dr. Mercola

Americans struggle with high levels of certain diseases like cardiovascular disease and related high blood pressure. In fact, the World Health Organization ranks this malady, also known as hypertension, as playing the leading role in heart disease.1

Conventional medicine says eating too much sodium is one cause of high blood pressure, but more studies are revealing that it’s actually an imbalance between your sodium intake and your potassium levels that may be the problem. According to one study:

“Findings suggest that public health efforts directed toward increasing consumption of K+ [potassium]-rich natural foods would reduce BP [blood pressure] and, thus, cardiovascular and kidney disease.”2

Potassium deficiency, known as hypokalemia, can be so serious that it could be fatal. One sign that you may be deficient is high blood pressure, but other things to look for include:

  • Fatigue
  • Muscle weakness
  • Abdominal pain and cramps
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Muscle paralysis

Potassium: The ‘Good Salt’

There are a few facts about potassium that few people are aware of. First, it’s an essential mineral, but another thing to note is that, as an electrolyte, it plays a crucial role in regard to your blood pressure.

In spite of loads of studies and reports to the contrary, the fact is that it’s the balance between salt and potassium that will balance the health of your cells, not lowering your salt intake, unless of course, you’re talking about processed table salt.

Foods With High Potassium Content Help Lower Blood Pressure Levels

People with higher intakes of potassium tend to have lower blood pressure levels, so finding the foods to eat that contain it will definitely be good for you. For a good balance of potassium to sodium in your diet, eat fresh, whole, potassium-rich foods. I recommend:

Swiss chard Avocado Spinach Crimini mushrooms
Broccoli Brussels sprouts Celery Romaine lettuce

Additionally, Authority Nutrition3 notes other foods with high potassium content, such as leafy greens, tomatoes and sweet potatoes, wild-caught Alaskan sockeye salmon, melons, bananas, oranges and apricots. Fruits should be eaten in moderation, however, due to the fructose content.

Besides significantly lowering your blood pressure, pomegranate juice may protect your cells from negative effects like premature aging.

It’s also high in antioxidant polyphenols to cut your cancer and heart disease risks, and more antioxidants from tannins, anthocyanins and ellagic acid than green tea and red wine, Prevent Disease adds.4

Fruit polyphenols have been shown to have such a positive influence on potentially fatal heart-related issues that related research may even help change recommendations on what fruits are most beneficial to consume for optimal cardiovascular protection, one study concluded.5

A Florida study6 reported that 1 cup of blueberries a day may lower blood pressure and relax arteries. Around 50 hypertensive women were given either 22 grams of freeze-dried blueberry powder or a placebo powder to eat, with the result that the first group, on average, had a 7 mmHg drop in systolic blood pressure.

Raw grass fed yogurt is rich in probiotics, which helps keep blood pressure at balanced levels.

A review of several studies7 found that probiotics may benefit this area of your health naturally because they help optimize your cholesterol and lower blood sugar levels. And small amounts of dark chocolate provide flavonoids that cause blood vessels to dilate.8

Lifestyle Changes You Can Make to Lower Your Blood Pressure

Most people will say they want to live a “healthy” life, but it’s usually small, day-to-day decisions that make the difference in the long run. Blood pressure affects your body in a systemic way. If you struggle to maintain healthy levels, you may want to take a good look at your diet.

Conventional wisdom usually tells you to limit your salt intake, but the most impactful way to do the job is to cut down on sugar. As “bad” as salt is touted to be, sugar is far worse.

While you probably already know that processed foods are far too high in refined sodium, it’s refined sugar that’s the real culprit in the high incidence of high blood pressure and, consequently, the trickle-down effect of diseases that all too often follow along behind, such as metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, stroke and heart attack.

More and more studies indicate that sugar can be implicated in high blood pressure levels.9 In fact, one study shows that women who drank just one soda per day had higher levels that those who drank less than that.10

Researchers at the University of California–San Francisco and Touro University California conducted a study11 published in the journal Obesity that looked at the effects of limiting sugar intake. The study subjects were 43 children between the ages of 9 and 18 years.

For nine days, all the children ate meals, snacks and beverages with reduced sugar; however, they were allowed to eat fruit. Their fasting blood sugar levels, glucose tolerance and blood pressure were recorded before each meal.

All of them were given the same amounts of protein, fat and carbohydrates as before, including hot dogs, chips and pizza, but added sugar was replaced with bagels and cereal. In fact, sugar went from 28 percent to 10 percent. Carbs and fructose were reduced from 12 percent to 4 percent.

What Happens When Children Are Given Less Sugar to Eat?

Before long, the diet proved successful, as the scientists noted decreased blood pressure, improved cholesterol and improved liver function. Fasting blood glucose levels fell five points, while insulin levels dropped by a third.

This is particularly astonishing since the added sugar was replaced with bagels and cereal, which are far from healthy. Imagine if it had been replaced with vegetables or healthy fats! Lead author Robert Lustig stated:

“This study definitively shows that sugar is metabolically harmful not because of its calories or its effects on weight; rather sugar is metabolically harmful because it’s sugar.

(The study indicates) that sugar contributes to metabolic syndrome, and is the strongest evidence to date that the negative effects of sugar are not because of calories or obesity.”12

The Epoch Times quoted senior study author Jean-Marc Schwarz:

“These findings support the idea that it is essential for parents to evaluate sugar intake and to be mindful of the health effects of what their children are consuming. When we took the sugar out, the kids started responding to their satiety [fullness] cues.

They told us it felt like so much more food, even though they were consuming the same number of calories as before, just with significantly less sugar. Some said we were overwhelming them with food.”13

Active African-Americans Are Less Apt to Develop High Blood Pressure

Certain factors make high blood pressure more prevalent in some people than in others. One study based in Jackson, Mississippi, showed that African-Americans are less apt to develop high blood pressure if they’re physically active on a daily basis.

Further, study subjects who reported engaging in the ideal amounts of moderate to vigorous physical activity were about 24 percent less likely to have high blood pressure years later in comparison to those who didn’t.

As it happens, African-Americans have the highest blood pressure rates of any racial or ethnic group in the U.S., making heart attack, stroke and kidney disease risks more prevalent, and even early death. Unfortunately, the odds are high for this demographic. Dr. Keith Diaz of Columbia University Medical Center in New York explained:

“If you’re African-American, your odds of developing hypertension [are] pretty high. If you’re worried about hypertension or high blood pressure, one of the things you can do to prevent it is physical activity and exercise.”14

None of the 1,311 participants in the study had high blood pressure when they started it between 2000 and 2004. They were checked again between 2005 and 2008, and again between 2009 and 2013. Half them were monitored for at least eight years.

The upshot? Those getting 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week, or at least 75 minutes of vigorous exercise — specifically from programmed physical activity as opposed to household tasks —  were 24 percent less likely to have developed high blood pressure than people who didn’t.

How to Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

Most doctors charged with helping their patients with high blood pressure issues will hand their patients a pharmaceutical prescription, but there are remedies for this condition that cost far less, financially, physically, overall time consumed and long-term effects combined. Time15 and Authority Nutrition listed several, including:

  • Breathe. Mindfully slowing the breaths you take and breathing more slowly helps you relax, and relaxing helps improve your heart rate, makes your arteries more flexible and lowers your blood pressure, naturally.
  • Relax. Stress does more to negatively affect your body than you can imagine. Bouts of anger or stress, triggering your “fight or flight” hormones, can literally increase your risk of developing heart-related issues. Try the Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) and other natural methods to calm and soothe your mind.
  • Curb the coffee and alcohol. While there are studies that contend that moderate alcohol intake can provide heart benefits, overdoing it can raise your blood pressure, as well as cause subsequent health problems. Caffeine can also be a culprit, and it may come from drinking soda. Give it a rest — literally.
  • Walk and exercise regularly. Your heart is strengthened and pumps blood more efficiently, lowering arterial pressure. Just 150 minutes of moderate exercise like walking or 75 minutes of strenuous exercise such as high-intensity interval training (HIIT) can improve both.16
  • Lose weight. Even losing 5 percent of your total weight can significantly lower your blood pressure,17 and the effect is even greater when you exercise.18

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14 Best Herbs for Thyroid Problems and Support for Healthy Thyroids

Fresh ginseng rootThe thyroid is a very small gland found in the neck area that can certainly cause a great deal of trouble if it isn’t working properly. Size has nothing to do with the function of this gland. It may be small, but it performs a powerhouse of functions, including:

  • Regulation of heart and muscle activity
  • Regulates the metabolism and turns food into energy
  • Converts beat-carotene into vitamin A
  • Repairs bones
  • Transports electrolytes
  • Cellular protein synthesis
  • Regulates growth during childhood
  • Regulates a woman’s monthly cycle
  • Affects the mental process
  • Helps to regulate sex drive and libido

There are many ways you can help to keep your thyroid active and healthy. Herbs are always a terrific option that should always be used first before dangerous and toxic pharmaceuticals are even considered. (more…)

Study: High Amounts of Aluminum in Brains of Alzheimer’s Patients

Test tube with blood sample for toxic metals test

by Paul Fassa
Health Impact News

There have been unconfirmed suspicions that aluminum toxicity is at least a factor for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. There seems to be no doubt that aluminum is a neurotoxin, but whether there is an aluminum link to Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, has not been fully explored just recently.

A new study, “Aluminium [British spelling] in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer’s disease” does just that. A pathological brain study of deceased individuals whose bodies were donated by family members. It was conducted in King’s College of London and Keele University of Staffordshire, UK, and published December 2016 in the Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology.

The association of aluminum as a neurotoxin related to several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is often ignored or marginalized even as AD and other neurological disorders continue to rise in epidemic proportions.

This may be due to massive vested interests that use aluminum in ways that depend on its injection into the body or its inadvertent breathing in of nanoparticles.

Alzheimer Aluminum Study Details (more…)

Top 10 Reasons to Eat Your Cruciferous Veggies

10 Reasons to Eat Your Cruciferous Vegetables

Top 10 Reasons to Eat Your Cruciferous Veggies

Everyone knows that eating vegetables has profound health benefits. But, like all foods, not all vegetables are created the same. Some are better than others in terms of nutritional content, and overall contribution to vibrant health. If you look more closely at their phytochemical [plant-based chemical] content, or the growing amount of research into their specific effects on the body and disease, a few vegetables appear to be downright “miracle” foods!

One such group of veggies are those of the Brassica family; commonly known as cruciferous. These include broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, radish, rutabaga, turnip and even arugula.

What makes this group of veggies so special? Sulforaphane.

Sulforaphane is a phytochemical abundant in cruciferous vegetables, and it’s been getting a ton of attention from researchers. But it all starts with glucoraphanin.

Sulforaphane is produced when the enzyme myrosinase converts glucoraphanin, a glucosinolate (natural compound found in some plants), through a chemical reaction induced by damage to the plant, such as cutting or chewing. As such, glucoraphanin is known as the precursor to sulforaphane.

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Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked To Longer Life

Increased levels of vitamin D are associated with longer telomeres, reported to be a marker of biological aging, says a new study.

© iStock/Dr_Microbe
There are well over 800 references in the medical literature showing vitamin D’s effectiveness–both for the prevention and treatment of cancer.

In the absence of Vitamin D from sunlight, disease increases more than 1000 percent. Experts suggest that the chances of getting vitamin D from your diet are very low. And if you are a vegetarian, it is all the more difficult to gain vitamin D. What they repeatedly suggest is exposure to sunlight is the best source of vitamin D for longevity.

Every 10-nmol increase in levels of 25- hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), the non-active ‘storage’ form of the vitamin) was associated with a 0.03-kbp longer telomere in leukocytes in middle-aged adults, according to data extracted from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002.

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6 Proven Reasons To Eat The OTHER Black Berry

 6 Proven Reasons To Eat The OTHER Black Berry

Chances are you can find fresh blackberries pretty easily in your local market. But black raspberries (Rubus occidentalis) are a different story.  And they are worth seeking out. 

All berries are good sources of antioxidants but black raspberries take top prize.  According to Oregan State University Department of Food Science and Technology they contain almost three times the antioxidants of blackberries and more than six times the antioxidants of red raspberries.

They are also extremely high in anthocyanins, the antioxidant compounds that give purple foods their rich, unique color.  And they are rich in ellagic acid, a powerful anti-cancer, anti-viral, and anti-bacterial compound.

In a minute you’ll see how to tell a black raspberry from a blackberry in your market.  But first here are six amazing and proven benefits of black raspberries.

1. Blood Pressure

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Medication-Induced Mitochondrial Damage

drug induced mitochondrial damage

Damage to mitochondria is understood to play a role in the development of a wide range of seemingly unrelated disorders such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and others. Mitochondrial damage is also a hallmark of ME/CFS and Fibromyalgia.

Common causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in ME/CFS and Fibromyalgia are numerous. They include:

  • Dysbiosis
  • Chronic viral infections
  • Metabolic dysfunction (poor insulin control, nutrient depletion)
  • Toxin exposure (metals, mold, other environmental factors)

Another cause of mitochondrial dysfunction that is less frequently mentioned is medication usage. Mitochondrial toxicity testing is NOT required by the FDA before a drug is approved. Medications can hinder mitochondria through direct or indirect mechanisms.

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Graphic Shows Why You Should Avoid Nutella

Who didn’t love Nutella as a child? That chocolatey smooth texture which spreads so perfectly on any food. Contrary to what its manufacturers promoted for decades, Nutella is not a health food at all. With the exception of margarine, it’s the closest thing to spreadable junk food packed with sugar and one toxic ingredient in particular that has been linked with cancer.


55% of Nutella is sugar based.