Top 12 Most Healthy Benefits of Lentils (#11 Really Surprised Us!)

Lentils may be individually small, but they pack one heck of a nutritious punch. They’re full of essential minerals and nutrients like potassium, iron, folate, zinc, and calcium – all of which are important for your body’s well being. And they provide one of the richest sources of dietary fiber on earth. If you haven’t already made lentils a part of your weekly diet plan, here are twelve reasons why you should seriously consider doing so.

The Top 12 Health Benefits of Lentils

1. High in dietary fiber. Here’s a fun lentils nutrition fact: just one cup provides you with 63% of your recommended daily allowance of dietary fiber. They contain both soluble and insoluble fiber — both of which are important for your overall health.

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9 Herbs and Spices With Proven Health Benefits

9 Herbs and Spices With Proven Health Benefits

Even when our food choices aren’t the best, herbs and spices do more than just improve taste.  They give any meal a nutrition boost.  And according to a new study they may even reverse the damage from an unhealthy meal.

Researchers from Penn State University cooked up coconut chicken, cheese bread and a dessert biscuit for six men. The subjects were aged 30 to 65 and overweight but otherwise healthy.  On one day the meal was served plain.  On another day researchers added two tablespoons of a blend of nine herbs and spices to the meal.

After each meal the researchers drew blood from the subjects every 30 minutes for four hours.  They found that antioxidant activity in the blood increased 13% after the spicy meal compared to the plain meal.

The spices and herbs also decreased post-meal insulin levels by 21% and triglyceride levels in the blood by as much as 31%.  That in turn could reduce heart disease risk.

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7 Ways To Prevent and Even Reverse Heart Disease With Nutrition

7 Ways To Prevent and Even Reverse Heart Disease With Nutrition

You can reverse heart disease with nutrition, according to a growing body of scientific research.

Considering that heart disease is the #1 cause of death in the developed world, anything that can prevent cardiac mortality, or slow or even reverse the cardiovascular disease process, should be of great interest to the general public.

Sadly, millions of folks are unaware of the extensive body of biomedical literature that exists supporting the use of natural compounds for preventing and even reversing heart disease.

Instead, they spend billions buying highly toxic cholesterol-lowering pharmaceuticals with known cardiotoxicity, among 300 other proven side effects, simply because their doctor told them to do so.

So, with this in mind, let’s look at the biomedical literature itself.

Three Natural Substances that Reduce the Risk of Heart-Related Death

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Why Eating Late is Harming Your Health

why eating late is harming your health

Could those late night snacks be adding to your waistline and causing harm to your heart? A new study suggests that its better to eat during the daylight hours.

Nighttime snackers take note: eating late is harming your health, or so suggests a recent study out of San Diego State University.

While the study looked at fruit flies, and not humans, the findings do provide compelling reasons to investigate further whether there is a causal link between late night eating and heart health, amongst other health measures. I have been saying for some time, it is not just WHAT you eat, but WHEN you eat too.

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7 Reasons to Get More Magnesium

7 Reasons to Get More Magnesium

Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in your body, and is the reason why vegetables are green.  But few people fully appreciate the importance of this miraculous mineral. 

The human genome project reveals that 3,751 human proteins have binding sites for magnesium.[i]  And so far we know this one essential mineral activates over 350 biochemical processes in the body to keep things flowing.

Plants are green because they contain the light-harvesting molecule chlorophyll which bears a striking resemblance to human hemoglobin (with the difference that the latter contains an oxygen-binding iron atom and not magnesium).

Here are just seven good reasons to get more magnesium-rich foods in your diet today.

1. Prevent Migraines.

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Nutrient Spotlight—Green Tea

 

It originated more than 4,000 years ago and was a pivotal part of Chinese and Japanese culture. Scholars wrote about it. Emperors savored it. Zen monks obsessed over it.

For millennia, it was an indispensable ingredient in traditional medicines and alternative remedies. And today you can buy it in coffee shop chains, in grocery stores and in outdoor markets. You can even get it in supplement form.

In fact, it is the second most consumed beverage on the planet, after water. And with its mild flavor and soul-warming scent, it’s not hard to see why this beverage is so popular.

We are, of course, talking about green tea.

What is Green Tea?

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Low Vitamin D Linked To Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

A low vitamin D intake in childhood is associated with a higher risk of a type of cardiovascular disease that can be diagnosed in in adulthood, researchers in Finland have found.

The researchers, led by Markus Juonala from the University of Turku, measured vitamin D levels of children and young people at baseline and then measured for carotid intima-thickness (IMT) — an indicator of structural atherosclerosis — as adults.

Some findings show that women who don’t get enough vitamin E in their diets also appear to be more likely than others to show early signs of atherosclerosis, even before they experience any symptoms of the condition. They concluded that the highest risk of early atherosclerosis were those who took in the lowest amount of vitamin E in their diets.

Blood levels <20 ng/ml) are associated with nearly a 50 percent increase in the mortality rate in older adults. Although vitamin D can be obtained from limited dietary sources and directly from exposure to the sun during the spring and summer months, the combination of poor dietary intake and sun avoidance has created vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency in large proportions of many populations worldwide.

Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease caused by accumulation of cholesterol in the artery leading to inflammation and atheroma (blocked arteries). It is sub-clinical – meaning asymptomatic — and can therefore go undetected and untreated for decades.

The scientists studied 2,148 young Finnish people, measuring vitamin D levels at age 3-18 years using stored serum. The subjects were then re-examined 27 years later at age 30-45 years, with measurements of IMT taken from the posterior wall of the left carotid artery using ultrasound.

The scientists also took into account other conventional cardiovascular risk factors, such as diet, physical activity and smoking, measured using detailed questionnaires and confidential medical histories at both childhood and adulthood.

Results

The scientists found that subjects with 25-OH vitamin D levels in the lowest quartile in childhood (_ 40 nmol/L) were at significantly higher risk of IMT as adults (21.9% vs 12.7%, P _ .001).

Vitamin levels below 43 nmol/L were associated with an increased IMT risk. Current US guidelines suggest that the optimal level in childhood is 50nmol/L.

“The association was independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors including serum lipids, blood pressure, smoking, diet, physical activity, obesity indices and socioeconomic status,” said Markus Juonala of the University of Turku Finland, one of the study’s authors.

“Conversely, low levels of adult vitamin D were not associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. This suggests that the effects of vitamin D on cardiovascular risk may operate earlier in the life-course.”

An argument for supplementation?

“More research is needed to investigate whether low vitamin D levels have a causal role in the development increased carotid artery thickness. Nevertheless, our observations highlight the importance of providing children with a diet that includes sufficient vitamin,” Juonala said.

The study identified children at high risk of developing vitamin D deficiency as those whose diet is poor in sources of vitamin D (either through natural sources or fortified foods), those who do not regularly take food supplements or children who do not have adequate sunlight exposure.

Since the baseline measurements of the study were taken, legislation regarding food fortification in Finland and other Scandinavian countries has been relaxed and most milks, margarines and yoghurts are now fortified with vitamin D, leading to “higher serum vitamin D levels in children and adolescents.”

“Food fortification is an effective tool to improve the vitamin D status in the whole population as is demonstrated in countries like the US and Canada; food fortification is “cheap”, effective and has a high return on investment,” however the quality of vitamin D may need to be improved to render it effective.

“In my view the Nordic countries are the ‘front runners’ in communicating the risk of vitamin D inadequacy for the general population as well as in putting fortification with vitamin D in place. The other countries in Europe are lagging behind however (…) and we do not see progress in fortification of food items like dairy products.”

Source:
endocrine.org

Mae Chan holds degrees in both physiology and nutritional sciences. She is also blogger and and technology enthusiast with a passion for disseminating information about health.

http://preventdisease.com/news/15/021515_Low-Vitamin-D-Linked-Increased-Risk-Cardiovascular-Disease.shtml

Worried About Clogged Arteries? Drink This.

Worried About Clogged Arteries? Drink This.

Millions take toxic cholesterol and blood pressure lowering drugs that may do nothing to reduce heart disease specific mortality. Pomegranate juice, on the other hand, actually reverses underlying pathologies of the cardiovascular system that lead to bypass surgeries and heart attacks. 

One of the most amazing clinical studies ever performed has been hidden away behind a pay wall for over a decade. When I first stumbled upon this clinical pearl two years ago, in the form of the publicly indexed abstract on pubmed.gov, my jaw nearly dropped. I’ve finally acquired the full version of the study and am now excited to report on its implications in greater depth to help raise awareness about the power of pomegranate to heal the body, and I believe, save millions lives from premature death from heart disease.

The most eye-opening line in the abstract reveals why our original report on the study, How To Clean Your Arteries With One Simple Fruit, received over 500,000 social media shares:

“Pomegranate juice consumption resulted in a significant IMT [intima media thickness] reduction, by up to 30%, after 1 year.”

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