The a.m. Habit That Doubles Your Risk of Lung Cancer

Let’s be honest. If you’re a smoker, you’re already spiking your odds of one day being handed a cancer diagnosis.

But now new research has found that a specific smoking habit could literally be almost doubling your risk of getting lung cancer. I’m talking about the routine of lighting up your first cigarette within 30 minutes of waking up. (more…)

Marijuana cuts lung cancer tumor growth in half, Harvard study shows

The active ingredient in marijuana cuts tumor growth in common lung cancer in half and significantly reduces the ability of the cancer to spread, say researchers at Harvard University who tested the chemical in both lab and mouse studies.

They say this is the first set of experiments to show that the compound, Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), inhibits EGF-induced growth and migration in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expressing non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. Lung cancers that over-express EGFR are usually highly aggressive and resistant to chemotherapy.

THC that targets cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 is similar in function to endocannabinoids, which are cannabinoids that are naturally produced in the body and activate these receptors. The researchers suggest that THC or other designer agents that activate these receptors might be used in a targeted fashion to treat lung cancer.

 

source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070417193338.htm

Soy Isoflavones Block Cancer Cells’ DNA Repair Mechanisms While Protecting Normal Tissue, Increasing Radiation’s Ability To Kill Lung Cancer Cells

A component in soybeans increases radiation’s ability to kill lung cancer cells, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, the official monthly journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer.
“To improve radiotherapy for lung cancer cells, we are studying the potential of natural non-toxic components of soybeans, called soy isoflavones, to augment the effect of radiation against the tumor cells and at the same time protect normal lung against radiation injury,” said Dr. Gilda Hillman, an associate professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Wayne State University’s School of Medicine and the Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit.
“These natural soy isoflavones can sensitizec cancercells to the effects of radiotherapy, by inhibiting survival mechanisms which cancer cells activate to protect themselves,” Hillman said. “At the same time, soy isoflavones can also act as antioxidants in normal tissues, which protect them against unintended damage from the radiotherapy. In a recent study, published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, we demonstrated that soy isoflavones increase killing of cancer cells by radiation via blocking DNA repair mechanisms, which are turned on by the cancer cells to survive the damage caused by radiation.”
Human A549 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells that were treated with soy isoflavones before radiation showed more DNA damage and less repair activity than cells that received only radiation.
Researchers used a formulation consisting of the three main isoflavones found in soybeans, including genistein, daidzein and glycitein.
Previously, researchers had found that pure genistein demonstrated antitumor activity in human NSCLC cell lines and enhanced the effects of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This study showed that the soy mixture had an even greater antitumor effect than pure genistein. The soy mixture also is consistent with the soy isoflavone pills used in clinical studies, which have been proven to be safe, researchers said.

The study was supported by the American Institute for Cancer Research. 

Source: Medical News Today

More vitamin D could help prevent lung cancer recurrence

Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center report in the February 15, 2011 issue of the journal Clinical Cancer Research that an enzyme elevated in lung cancer that reduces the active form of vitamin D is associated with more aggressive tumors and worse survival. The finding could aid the development of an agent to protect against the return of the disease following surgery. (more…)