Low Vitamin D linked to allergies in children

A new paper published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has found a link between low vitamin D levels and the onset of allergies in children. The study of over 3,000 children concluded that among children with low or deficient levels of vitamin D, sensitivity to allergens was present in more than half of those for which they tested.

A research team from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University in New York collected blood samples from more than 3,100 children and 3,400 adults, and analyzed sensitivity to 17 different allergens. The team measured the production levels of Immunoglobulin E (IgE), the protein made when the immune system reacts to allergens, and compared it to blood serum levels of vitamin D.

While no specific correlation in this particular study was observed between vitamin D and allergens in adults, children and adolescents with low levels of vitamin D were found to be sensitive to an average of 11 of the 17 allergens, which included environmental allergens like ragweed and oak, and food allergens like eggs and peanuts. Children with less than 15 nanograms per milliliter (Ng/mL) of vitamin D in their blood, which was the threshold of deficiency used in the study, were 240 percent more likely to have a peanut allergy than children with 30 Ng/mL of vitamin D or higher, for instance.

The findings confirm those of a 2007 Harvard University study that claimed increased sunlight exposure could reduce the onset of both allergies and asthma in children. That study found a link between vitamin D deficiency and such conditions in adults as well, noting that pregnant women who are vitamin D deficient are more likely to bear children with allergies or asthma than pregnant women with higher levels (http://www.ei-resource.org/news/all…).

To learn more about the many benefits of maintaining high levels of vitamin D, visit:
http://www.vitamindcouncil.org

Sunday, February 27, 2011 by: Ethan A. Huff

Synbiotics Prevent Asthma-Like Symptoms in Patients with Eczema.

Atopic dermatitis is often referred to as “eczema,” which is a general term for several types of inflammation of the skin and is the most common of the many types of eczema. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic (long-lasting) disease that affects the skin. It is not contagious; it cannot be passed from one person to another. In atopic dermatitis, the skin becomes extremely itchy. Scratching leads to redness, swelling, cracking, “weeping” clear fluid, and finally, crusting and scaling. In most cases, there are periods of time when the disease is worse (called exacerbations or flares) followed by periods when the skin improves or clears up entirely (called remissions). As some children with atopic dermatitis grow older, their skin disease improves or disappears altogether, although their skin often remains dry and easily irritated. In others, atopic dermatitis continues to be a significant problem in adulthood.

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Reishi Mushroom helps people get off steroids, controls asthma, stops adrenal fatigue and much more

This formula is proven to be as effective as Prednisone at alleviating asthma symptoms but without such severe side effects

 

Ling Zhi (Ganoderma or Reishi mushroom) has been recorded as having the most extensive and effective healing powers in all of Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is indicated for adrenal fatigue, coronary heart disease, bronchial asthma, insomnia, impotence, hay fever, dizziness, stomach ulcers, depression (by addressing the shen or spirit) and addresses debility from long-term illness.
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Vitamin D – A Gene-Regulating Super Nutrient

one study with 2100 female twins showed that having adequate vitamin D extends life by five years

Patients with Parkinson’s were 55% more likely to be low in vitamin D.

Some of the newer colon cancer research finds that vitamin D turns on death signals in colon cancer cells and works synergistically with calcium to help prevent colon cancer cells from spreading.

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Why Exercise-Induced Asthma is Linked to Obesity

A new study has demonstrated for the first time that as your body mass rises your risk for exercise-induced asthma1 rises.  Seventy-one percent of obese people have exercise-induced asthma. This is important because it demonstrates that weight gain progressively chokes off normal oxygenation of your body and proper oxygenation of your body is a core fundamental principle of health. (more…)

Early Antibiotic Use Increases Asthma Risk

Asthma in our children is an epidemic. I have long argued that the asthma epidemic in American children is a result of the incompetent practice of medicine that relies on the use of highly toxic antibiotics in children. My position is now confirmed by a new Yale University study1 that followed 1400 children from birth until 6 years of age.

The study is significant because it distinguishes between antibiotics for respiratory infections wherein the respiratory infection may have been the first sign of asthma. The researchers simply eliminated those from the study who were given antibiotics for respiratory infection. (more…)

Anti-biotics, gut flora, food intolerance and disease

Cattle Are Finished by Selective Killing of Gut Flora.  The Sickened Animals Store Fat that Grills Great.  People Get Metabolic Syndrome.
The likening of modern humans to potatoes sacked out on a couch is misleading.  The obesity epidemic linked to diets of processed foods more closely resembles the stumbling progression of cattle to abattoir.  Antibiotics and diet systematically lead in both feedlot and food court to gut dysbiosis, immune system failure, hormone disruption, rampant fat accumulation, physical inactivity, depression and the modern suite of chronic diseases.  Healthcare costs escalate, but vet bills, in contrast, are forestalled by a captive bolt pistol. (more…)