Early Antibiotic Use Increases Asthma Risk

Asthma in our children is an epidemic. I have long argued that the asthma epidemic in American children is a result of the incompetent practice of medicine that relies on the use of highly toxic antibiotics in children. My position is now confirmed by a new Yale University study1 that followed 1400 children from birth until 6 years of age.

The study is significant because it distinguishes between antibiotics for respiratory infections wherein the respiratory infection may have been the first sign of asthma. The researchers simply eliminated those from the study who were given antibiotics for respiratory infection. (more…)

Training performance and recovery: Carbs

Carbohydrates seem to be a very misunderstood macronutrient these days. There are some who believe consuming any carbohydrates will make you fat and unhealthy, while there are others who consume absolutely enormous amounts of carbohydrates, believing them to be the key to health. In reality the truth, as usual, is somewhere in the middle.
While carbohydrates are neither evil nor perfect, they can be an excellent choice to help you train harder and longer, and recover faster. Consuming some carbohydrates before and after your training can have some incredibly powerful benefits which will help to maximize the results of your efforts. (more…)

Resveratrol at the ready for fighting heart disease

A few years back, researchers decided that resveratrol was the secret ingredient in red wine that was responsible for the so-called “French paradox.” Not only could it protect the heart from oxidized fat, resveratrol also appeared to reduce platelet aggregation and increase blood flow. The problem was, no one knew how much resveratrol was needed to create these heart-healthy changes … until now.

New research conducted at the University of South Australia suggests that taking a daily resveratrol supplement can rapidly improve vascular function and lead to better heart health.  (more…)

Herbal Supplement May Reduce Risk of Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is a cancer that forms in tissues of the breast, usually the ducts (tubes that carry milk to the nipple) and lobules (glands that make milk). It occurs in both men and women, although male breast cancer is rare. Risk factors for breast cancer include gender, age, family history, defective genes, early onset of menstruation, late menopause and late childbearing. Breast cancer is about ninety percent due to genetic abnormalities that happen as a result of the aging process and the “wear and tear” of life in general.

A study published in the journal Breast Cancer investigated the effects of an herbal formula on breast health in women not taking hormonal contraceptives or supplements.  (more…)

Rye Bread Enriched with Plant Sterols Effects Cholesterol Levels

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that occurs naturally in all parts of the body. The body needs some cholesterol to work properly. But if there is too much cholesterol in the blood, it can stick to the walls of the arteries. This is called plaque. Plaque can the arteries or even block them. High levels of cholesterol in the blood can increase the risk of heart disease. Cholesterol levels tend to rise with age. There are usually no signs or symptoms that indicate high blood cholesterol, but it can be detected with a blood test. Chances of having high cholestesterol would include if family members have it, being overweight or eating a lot of fatty foods. (more…)

Panax Ginseng for Cognitive Function

Cognitive function is the term used to describe a person’s state of consciousness (alertness and orientation), memory, and attention span. A mental status examination (MSE) is a standard test used by healthcare professionals to measure a patient’s overall mental health. Evaluating a patient’s cognitive function includes, first of all, measuring their level of alertness and orientation. (more…)

Melatonin May Play a Role in the Treatment of Glaucoma

Glaucoma is the second most common cause of blindness in the United States. It is often, but not always, associated with increased pressure of the fluid in the eye, known as intraocular pressure. One person may develop nerve damage at a relatively low pressure, while another person may have high eye pressure for years and yet never develop nerve damage. (more…)

Flouride not safe, will this ever end?

Did you know that for the past 70 years you’ve been drinking the most toxic chemical found in nature?

You can’t smell it…you can’t taste it…and you probably have long-since forgotten that this dangerous substance was ever added to our water supply. But the fact is that the EPA started adding this toxic element to public drinking water in the 1940s. Ironically, the goal was to protect children.

This stuff is the equivalent of ingestible gasoline. In fact, it’s probably even far worse than petrol. Yet for all these years, it’s been heralded as “good for you.” (more…)

Free radicals implicated in common eye disease

The American Journal of Pathology‘s November, 2010 issue reports the outcome of research conducted by Ula V. Jurkunas, MD and her colleagues at the Schepens Eye Research Institute in Boston which implicates free radical damage in the development of Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD), a potentially blinding disease characterized by the programmed cell death of epithelial cells in the eye’s cornea (the clear tissue in the front of the eye) which is the most common reason for corneal transplant surgery. Free radicals are unstable molecules that damage a variety of tissues, resulting in many of the diseases and conditions associated with aging. While some free radical damage is inevitable, increasing the body’s levels of antioxidants, which bind with and neutralize free radicals, can help moderate this damage. (more…)