What To Do For A Fever

Of all the concerns that parents have contacted my office about over the years, one of the most common ones has been what to do with a child’s fever.

In addressing this concern, it’s vital to understand that a fever serves to protect your body against infection and trauma in three major ways:

  1. A fever stimulates your immune system into producing more white blood cells, antibodies, and a protein called interferon, all of which work to protect your body against harmful microorganisms.
  2. By raising your body’s temperature a few degrees, a fever makes it harder for invading bacteria and viruses to survive and flourish. The higher your core body temperature is, the harder it is for harmful microorganisms to survive in your body.
  3. A fever helps to shuttle iron to your liver so that it is not readily available to fuel the growth of invading bacteria. (more…)

Body Temperature and Thyroid Problems

Too hot? Too cold? How do you know if this indicates poor thyroid function or something else?

When your thyroid hormone is working properly inside cells you will make 65 percent energy and 35 percent heat as you burn calories for fuel. Thyroid hormone governs your basal metabolic rate, orchestrating the idling speed at which all cells make energy and thus heat. A classic symptom of poor thyroid function is being too cold. Conversely, a classic symptom of hyperthyroidism is being too hot (making too much heat). However, many people with low thyroid are too hot—a seeming paradox that I will explain shortly. (more…)