Manufacturing Madness: The Pseudoscience of Modern Psychiatry

Twenty-six years have passed since Prozac, the antidepressant drug, was introduced to the US market and quickly achieved the label of a “wonder drug.” In the decade that followed, other antidepressant drugs including paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), fluvoxamine (Luvox), and citalopram (Celexa) would be released, creating an entire class of medications known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Since hitting the shelves, the popularity of SSRIs has skyrocketed. Today, 1 in every 10 Americans reaches for antidepressants daily.[1] This ratio jumps to an incredible 25% among women between the ages of 40 and 59.[2] Approximately 5% of children ages 12 to 19 are also taking antidepressants.[3]  Worldwide, mental illness is now the leading cause of disability among children.[4]

Active members and veterans of the US military have become especially dependent on psychiatric meds. Today, about 1 in 6 service members is using antidepressants, sedatives, and other psychiatric drugs in an attempt to cope with post traumatic stress disorder and other afflictions.[5]  From 2001-2009 alone, psychiatric drug use in this demographic rose by 76% and in 2010 alone, the Pentagon spent more than $280 million on psychiatric drugs.[6] [7]

Along with the rise in antidepressant use in recent years, we have witnessed the creation of many new clinical diagnoses in the field of psychiatry.  What would have been considered just a few years ago to be rebellious behavior among teenagers is now termed Oppositional Defiant disorder; what was once looked upon as a child not wanting to do math homework is now classified as Mathematics Disorder.  As the psychiatric establishment increasingly asserts its importance by pathologizing normal human behaviors, tens of millions of Americans are popping pills in an attempt to find mental wellbeing. All the while, Big Pharma is making a killing; in 2010 alone, SSRI sales topped $70 billion.[8]

Considering how widely SSRIs are prescribed, you would be forgiven for thinking that this class of drugs is highly safe and effective. In point of fact, these drugs come with a host of devastating and sometimes deadly health implications. Examining the state of the medical industrial complex deeper still makes one thing abundantly clear: Psychiatry is NOT a science but a massively destructive unscientific experiment fueled by a medical industrial complex that values profits over human life and wellbeing.

Let’s break it down:

FACT: Psychiatric Drugs are Dangerous (more…)

Antidepressants Can Cause Sudden Death

Most antidepressants cause a change in the electrical pulse of the heart, which changes the rhythm of the heart beat. It’s called an extended QT interval—and it can result in sudden death with no warning of any kind: BMJ study.

Eyes and Teardrops Graphic by Joana Roja

Eyes and Teardrops graphic by Joana Roja

by Heidi Stevenson

The antidepressant citalopram—brand names Celexa and Cipramil—has joined a growing list of drugs that can cause sudden death by stopping the heart. The study, published in the BMJ[1], found that the drug causes lengthening in the QT interval, a part of the heart beat cycle. (more…)

Psychiatry and Drugs

Last summer, Marcia Angell, MD, reviewed three new books about psychiatry and psychiatric drugs for the New York Review of Books: The Emperor’s New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth by Irving Kirsch; Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America by Robert Whitaker; and Unhinged: The Trouble with Psychiatry – A Doctor’s Revelations About a Profession in Crisis by Daniel Carlat. Her two-part essay discusses the history of psychiatry, its relationship to the pharmaceutical industry, and the flawed rationale underlying the use of psychoactive drugs. Angell, former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, has long criticized the quality and clinical validity of medical research, particularly pharmaceutical studies. (more…)

You could take vitamin D or . . .

You could take vitamin D and achieve a desirable blood level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (I aim for 60-70 ng/ml), or you could:

–Take Actos to mimic the enhanced insulin sensitivity generated by vitamin D
–Take lisinopril to mimic the angiotensin-converting enzyme blocking, antihypertensive effect of vitamin D
–Take Fosamax or Boniva to mimic the bone density-increasing effect of vitamin D
–Take Celexa or other SSRI antidepressants to mimic the mood-elevating and winter “blues”-relieving effect of vitamin D
—Take Niaspan to mimic the HDL-increasing, small LDL-reducing effect of vitamin D
–Take naproxen to mimic the pain-relieving effect of vitamin D (more…)