Magnesium Lowers Colorectal Cancer Risk

Magnesium Lowers Colorectal Cancer Risk

An astounding 70% or more of Americans are deficient in the essential mineral magnesium.  Low levels can have deadly effects.

Epidemiologic studies have suggested that low magnesium may be associated with higher rates of colorectal cancer among other diseases.  Now a meta-analysis confirms that higher magnesium intakes are associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer and especially colon cancer.

Researchers from Soochow University in China analyzed eight prospective studies covering 338,979 participants. Their results, published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found the highest average intake of magnesium was associated with an 11% reduction in colorectal cancer risk compared to the lowest average intake.

In addition, the researchers found that for every 50 mg per day increase in magnesium, colon cancer was reduced by 7%.

The results are consistent with an earlier meta-analysis by Imperial College London and Wageningen University finding for every 100 mg increase in magnesium, colorectal cancer decreased by 13%.

Unfortunately, only about 20% of Americans get the recommended daily magnesium intake of 420 mg for men or 320 mg for women.  And a deficiency can be debilitating.

Magnesium participates in over 300 known biochemical reactions in your body.  Recent research from the human genome project reveals that 3,751 human proteins have binding sites for magnesium.

Magnesium supports harmonious flow within various body systems.  Without it things get stuck.  This can show up as constipation and other digestive problems, irregularities in menstrual flow and reproductive health, muscle spasms, nocturnal leg cramps, and migraine headaches.

The health benefits of magnesium are far greater than previously imagined.  This one essential mineral keeps your heart rhythm steady…promotes normal blood pressure…helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function…supports a healthy immune system…regulates blood sugar…and keeps your memory strong.

It’s not difficult to boost magnesium levels with whole foods.  One of the richest sources of magnesium is high quality chocolate. Dark chocolate has a whopping 176 mg of magnesium in a 3.5 ounce bar.  In fact, if you crave chocolate your body may be telling you it’s low in magnesium.

Other high magnesium foods include:

  • Dried seaweeds
  • Dark leafy greens (especially spinach and Swiss chard)
  • Broccoli
  • Beans
  • Whole grains (especially brown rice and quinoa)
  • Almonds, cashews, and filberts
  • Sesame seeds
  • Lentils
  • Avocados
  • Spirulina and chlorella

Visit GreenMedInfo’s page on magnesium documenting well over 100 health benefits of magnesium.

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9 Reasons You May Want to Indulge in a Little Dark Chocolate Today

Chocolate

Studies show that a little dark chocolate each day can provide a number of important health benefits.
Have you been avoiding chocolate lately because of a desire to eat a healthy diet, or because you’re trying to shed a few pounds?

There’s no doubt some forms of chocolate are high in calories, but if you choose carefully, you can indulge in that sweet taste and enjoy a number of health benefits, as well.

9 Reasons to Snack on a Little Chocolate

Over the last several years, scientists have discovered that dark chocolate containing at least 60 percent cocoa solids has health promoting antioxidants that may be good for us in many ways. Here’s a glance at the research so far. (more…)

What Chocolate Can Do For You

chocolate health benefits

By Jena Pincott

Katharine Hepburn reportedly said of herself, “What you see before you, my friend, is the result of a lifetime of chocolate.” Inspired, we broke that down into hours, weeks, months and years. Here’s what a fix can do….

Within 90 minutes…your neurons are humming.
One way in which scientists test for alertness and mental stamina is by asking their subjects to do math in their head — counting down by 3s and 7s, for instance — tasks so tedious they’re prescribed for insomnia. But 90 minutes after people drank cocoa, they rattled off correct numbers, found a study at the U.K.’s Northumbria University. Credit goes to flavanol, a plant antioxidant that has been found to widen blood vessels and increase blood flow in the brain. How much flavanol you get depends on origin, harvesting and processing, says one of the study’s authors, Crystal Haskell-Ramsay, PhD. The most flavanol-rich options are usually the darkest and bitterest, like cocoa powder and baking chocolate. To match the study’s cognitive sweet spot, she says, we’d need roughly 7 grams of special, enriched high-flavanol cocoa powder or a 3.5-ounce chocolate bar with at least 70-percent-cocoa content. (The cocoa powder in the study was CocoaPro; it’s in CocoaVia and Dove Dark Chocolate products.) (more…)

New Study Confirms Chocolate’s Fat-Busting Properties

New Study Confirms Chocolate's Fat-Busting Properties

One of my favorite past times is not only eating chocolate, but reporting on it.

Recently, for instance, I reported on a myth-busting study finding chocolate burns belly fat, as well as improves cholesterol.[i] Before that I reported on research indicating that the medicinal properties of chocolate are so powerful that this treat gives the 29 billion dollar statin drug industry a run for its money as far as protecting you from the #1 cause of death in the Western world.

No doubt, chocolate lovers are reveling in the fact that their love affair with this irresistible treat is increasingly being officially sanctified by today’s lab coat wearing priestly caste. After all, many folks suffer from a love/hate relationship with chocolate; ambivalent over their habitual consumption of something still generally considered to be ‘candy,’ and indeed is still placed in the candy aisle of institutions such as grocery stores and pharmacies.  (more…)

Cinnamon Combined With Magnesium Decreases Blood Pressure More Than Any Hypertension Medication In The World

Supplementation with cinnamon has been found to lower blood pressure in pre-diabetic and diabetic people. Cinnamon combined with magnesium, diet and lifestyle changes may lead to overall reductions in blood pressure up to 25mm Hg, a reduction lower than any hypertension medication can achieve without side effects.

http://www.cambridgenaturals.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Chocolate_Cinnamon_Magnesium-.jpg

Data from 22 trials with magnesium supplements revealed that the mineral may reduce systolic and diastolic blood pressure, researchers from the University of Hertfordshire report in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. (more…)

Myth-Melting Study Finds Chocolate Burns Belly Fat, Improves Cholesterol

Myth-Melting Study Finds Chocolate Burns Belly Fat, Improves Cholesterol

A new study published in the European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences has revealed something quite counterintuitive about chocolate, one of the world’s most prized ‘high-fat’ foods.  This strangely medicinal ‘sweat treat,’ which ironically you find in the candy aisle at the pharmacy, improved markers of cardiovascular disease, including the reduction of belly fat, and only after one week of consumption. (more…)

Chocolate Gives Statins A $29 Billion Run For Their Money

 Flickr - Chocolate - Patrick HoeslySayer Ji, Green Med Info

Waking Times

With the blockbuster cholesterol-lowering class of drugs known as statins being widely promoted for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, despite their having over 300 documented adverse health effects (including heart failure!), how does chocolate sound as a viable, heart-friendly alternative?

We already connect amorously with chocolate (to the tune of 6 billion lbs of cocoa consumed annually worldwide), revealing in heart-felt expressions like “I love it,” and “this is to die for!” how comfortable we are with publicly declaring our affection. But did you know that while it makes our emotional hearts sing, it may actually keep our physical hearts happy, alive and ticking longer, as well?

Indeed, back in 2006, researchers found that for elderly men, eating cocoa intake was inversely associated with blood pressure and 15-year cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. When compared with the lowest tertile (lowest 33%) of cocoa intake, the adjusted relative risk for men in the highest tertile was .50 for cardiovascular mortality, or a 50% reduction, and .53 for all-cause mortality, or a 47% reduction. Not bad considering the median cocoa intake among users was 2.11 grams per day, or just one half an ounce a week. While many people are searching out supplements such as ubiquinol to combat the side effects of statin drugs, they could have been eating chocolate instead.
Anything that can reduce your risk of dying from all causes by 50%, which is not an expensive and potentially dangerous drug, but a food, should be be taken seriously, even if — paradoxically — it is usually found in the candy section of the grocery store. (more…)

Cocoa Found to Prevent Colon Cancer

Isn’t it amazing that people instinctively gravitate toward what’s healthy for them unless their instincts have been manipulated by false advertising? Apparently we’ve been hardwired to seek out chocolate – the average American eats more than 11 pounds of it a year, and only 4 percent of people say they don’t like it. Science keeps discovering more reasons to support this grand design of nature’s. The latest finding shows cocoa may prevent intestinal pathologies including colon cancer. (more…)