New Study Confirms Gingko Biloba Aids Stroke Recovery

New Study Confirms Gingko Biloba Aids Stroke Recovery

A new study published in the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease confirms that extracts of one of the oldest plants in existence today, the ‘living fossil’ known as Gingko biloba, protects against stroke-related neurologic deficits in human subjects.[1]

Researchers at the University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran, lead a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled trial, in order to assess the efficacy of Gingko biloba on functional outcome in patients with acute stroke. In order to measure functional outcome they used The National Institutes of Heath Stroke Scale (NIHSS), a 15-item neurologic examination stroke scale used to evaluate the effect of acute cerebral infarction on the levels of consciousness, language, neglect, visual-field loss, extraocular movement, motor strength, ataxia, dysarthria, and sensory loss.[2] (more…)

Telomeres and Telomerase As Natural Therapeutic Targets

The Nobel Prize for Medicine (2009) was awarded to E. H. Blackburn, C. W. Greider, and J. W. Szostak for scientific research on telomeres and their controlling enzyme, telomerase. Research into the biological significance of telomeres and telomerase has proceeded at a frenetic pace over the past couple of decades. This area of science remains embryonic, but it holds the promise of providing new frontiers and foundations for understanding the emergence of chronic disease, cancer, and aging. The purpose of this article is to highlight concepts that are most relevant to the introduction of a natural clinical protocol to support the structure and function of telomeres.  (more…)