Single dose of antibiotic therapy can cause long-term gut damage

The statistics are sobering: in the United States alone, antibiotic-resistant bacteria cause 23,000 fatalities and at least 2 million new cases of disease annually. But if you think antibiotic resistance only comes about with massive and repeated rounds of antibiotics, think again.

Science shows that just one dose of antibiotic ‘therapy’ not only contributes to antibiotic resistance, but also brings about long-term damage to the microbes living in the gut. Many of the intestinal bacteria destroyed by antibiotics play a significant role in the body’s natural defense system against cancer and other disease conditions.

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Just one dose: Science reveals the true danger of antibiotics inside the gut (more…)

Gut Flora and Cancer – The Link Exposed!

In a hurry? Click here to read the Article Summary…

Let’s talk about your gut flora and cancer! You may not realize just how important your bowel condition (known as the microbiome) is to cancer prevention.

Spoiler Alert: Gut Health is Critical

A friend of mine recently pointed out an article in Bloomberg’s Business News that shows mainstream science is finally catching on to what I’ve been saying for a decade about gut health! The results of their data shocked the researchers with Roche AstraZeneca, but I wanted to do a face-palm!

Your good gut flora will help you prevent and fight cancer. That’s a fact.

Cultivating beneficial gut bacteria is your first line of defense against cancer and many other serious diseases. It does this by boosting your immune system at the places you’re almost always hit first with − toxins, heavy metals, parasites, fungi, and harmful bacteria.

Nurturing the system that protects you from so many layers of possible invasion of foreign contaminants should be common sense. But you’d be shocked how many in the medical community don’t recognize the importance of the gastrointestinal system in total health.

The man who heads up Roche’s cancer immunotherapy research, Daniel Chen, said, “Five years ago, if you had asked me about bacteria in your gut playing an important role in your systemic immune response, I probably would have laughed it off.”

And so many have, again and again, while doctors like me wanted to shake them and yell, “How can you not understand the science of this? How can you not see the connection between gut health and cancer (and heart disease, neurodegenerative disease, chronic pain…)?”

The Role of Your Immune System Against Cancer

(more…)

L-Glutamine Changes Gut Bacteria Leading To Weight Loss

L-Glutamine is the most common amino acid found in your muscles and it plays a key role in protein metabolism, and the ability to secrete human growth hormone, which helps metabolize body fat and support new muscle growth. Researchers have now found that a daily L-glutamine dose of 30 grams per day was associated with a significant reduction in the ratio of specific biomarkers for obesity.

L-Glutamine supplementation promotes a positive nitrogen balance and prevents the loss of muscle. Recent studies have shown that taking just 2 grams of L-Glutamine can increase growth hormone levels by 400%. v

The 30g dose studied was associated with a significant reduction in the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in obese and overweight people.

“The finding that L-glutamine promotes changes in the gut microbiota composition provides support for the importance of some nutrients in modulating the intestinal bacterial profile,” wrote the researchers in Nutrition . “These changes resembled the weight loss programs established in the literature.”

Gut health and obesity

The study adds to emerging body of science supporting the effects of gut microflora on metabolic factors and obesity. The connection between gut microbiota and energy homeostasis and inflammation and its role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related disorders are increasingly recognized.

Animals models of obesity connect an altered microbiota composition to the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes in the host through several mechanisms: increased energy harvest from the diet, altered fatty acid metabolism and composition in adipose tissue and liver.

Along with the increasing worldwide incidence of obesity-associated disorders, research has recently unraveled important pathways reciprocally connecting metabolism with the immune system of which L-glutamine plays a role. Although not a substitute for diet and exercise, manipulation of the gut microbiome through supplementation represents a novel approach to treating obesity.

A 2005 study by Jeffrey Gordon and his group at Washington University in St. Louis indicated that obese mice had lower levels of Bacteroidetes and higher levels of Firmicutes, compared with lean mice.

One year later and Dr Gordon’s reported similar findings in humans: The microbial populations in the gut are different between obese and lean people, and that when the obese people lost weight their microflora reverted back to that observed in a lean person, suggesting that obesity may have a microbial component (Nature, Vol. 444, pp. 1022-1023, 1027-1031).

Diet has recently been shown to strongly and rapidly influence the composition of the gut microbiota, raising the question of whether the diet independent of the obese phenotype is responsible for the changes in gut microbe composition.

A more recent paper from the same group in Science Translational Medicine (Vol. 3, 106ra106) reported that ingestion of probiotic bacteria produced a change in many metabolic pathways, particularly those related to carbohydrate metabolism.

The new study, albeit small scale and of limited duration, suggested that the amino acid L-glutamine may also have weight management potential by changing the bacterial composition in the gut.

The Brazilian researchers did not observe any changes in body weight during their 14 day study, but noted that a longer intervention period “may result in metabolic changes”.

Study details

The researchers recruited 33 overweight and obese adults, aged between 23 and 59 and randomly assigned them receive supplements of L-glutamine or L-alanine for two weeks.

Results showed that the L-glutamine group exhibited statistically significant differences in the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla compared with the ALA group.

A reduction of 0.3 was observed in the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio in the L-glutamine group, they added (from 0.85 to 0.57), while L-alanince was associated with an increased from 0.91 to 1.12.

“Thus, these findings suggest that oral supplementation of L-glutamine have similar effects on gut microbiota as weight loss,” said the researchers. “We would like to highlight that although the age range of the volunteers was large (23-59 y) and aging may have an effect on intestinal microbiota, the results obtained in this study were statistically significant.”

Commenting on a potential mechanism, they noted that L-Glutamine supplementation may reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines. “Some bacteria genera are associated with gut inflammation,” they wrote. “For example, increased levels of Veillonella are associated with higher levels of gut inflammation and the development of colitis and Crohn’s disease. In our study, the number of bacteria from the Veillonella genus reduced after L-glutamine supplementation, suggesting that L-glutamine may have an anti-inflammatory effect, at least in part, due to the decrease of this genus.

“In addition, increased abundance of the Prevotella genus has been described as a shield against inflammation and non-infectious diseases of the colon. After L-glutamine supplementation, but not after alanine, we observed an increase in Prevotella, suggesting that L-glutamine may have a protective effect on the gut via modulation of bacteria.”

Source:
nutritionjrnl.com
diabetesjournals.org
nature.com

Mae Chan holds degrees in both physiology and nutritional sciences. She is also blogger and and technology enthusiast with a passion for disseminating information about health.

http://preventdisease.com/news/15/020215_L-Glutamine-Changes-Gut-Bacteria-Leading-To-Weight-Loss.shtml

 

Groundbreaking Study Shows How Gut Bacteria Can Ameliorate Autism-Like Symptoms

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Beneficial bacteria is the gut are known to attack pathogens, manufacture B and K vitamins and even act as anti-cancer agents. New research appearing in the journal Cell strengthens the recent scientific understanding that the microbes that live in your gut may affect what goes on in your brain. It is also the first to show that a specific probiotic may be capable of reversing autism-like behaviors. (more…)

The Gut Has a Mind of Its Own: A Homeopathic Strategy to Uproot GI-Related Ills Healthy Living, Natural Remedies

http://takshzilabeta.com/blogs/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/gut_ii.jpgSince when do you think with your stomach? Since forever. And this applies to everyone: children, adults, even pets.

Presently, we flounder in the wake of a new trend where the gastrointestinal tract has been disturbed by drugs of commerce to a steroidal level.

I call it the post-modern medicine syndrome: we are in a post-antibiotic, post-birth control pill, post-steroid, post-health phase of human health. Two generations have now suffered in this climate of drug-induced illness, which we call iatrogenic disease.

We have traded our short-term acute ills, such as ear infections, sore throats, fevers, and zits for chronic illnesses: disorders such as ADHD, autism, Alzheimer’s, learning disabilities, and of course, food intolerances and allergies. The list goes on.

How did it happen? It’s a much simpler matter than it appears on the surface. One of the quickest ways to flip the switch from normal behavior and acceptable health to awful behavior and chronic illness is to employ one or all of these drugs and viola! A healthy GI tract to a disturbed GI tract. (more…)

Gut Bacteria May Be Implicated in Rheumatoid Arthritis

The bacteria that live in your intestines are a mixed blessing. Scientists have known for decades that this so-called microbiota helps us digest our food and crowds out infectious germs. The bugs have also been implicated in allergies and obesity. Now, a new study adds one more potential malady to the list: rheumatoid arthritis.

“It’s been suspected for years and years, both in humans and in the animal model, that the development of autoimmune diseases like arthritis is dependent on the gut microbiota,” says immunologist Diane Mathis of Harvard Medical School in Boston. Now, she says, those suspicions are beginning to be confirmed in humans. “It’s a very striking finding.” (more…)

Changing gut bacteria through diet affects brain function, UCLA study shows

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UCLA researchers now have the first evidence that bacteria ingested in food can affect brain function in humans. In an early proof-of-concept study of healthy women, they found that women who regularly consumed beneficial bacteria known as probiotics through yogurt showed altered brain function, both while in a resting state and in response to an emotion-recognition task.

The study, conducted by scientists with UCLA’s Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress and the Ahmanson–Lovelace Brain Mapping Center at UCLA, appears in the current online edition of the peer-reviewed journal Gastroenterology. (more…)

A New Discovery in Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Recently, scientists have started to speculate that gut bacteria may play an essential role in the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). (1)

Gut bacteria may influence obesity and diabetes.

You may not be familiar with NAFLD, but it is currently the most common liver disease worldwide, both in adults and in children, including 20% of the American population.(2)(3)

So far, instead of understanding what causes fatty liver, we only have a list of disorders that are associated with it. For example:

  • Insulin resistance
  • Obesity
  • Hyperlipidemia, or high cholesterol
  • Diabetes mellitus (type II)
  • High blood pressure (more…)