The One Bacteria That Causes Tooth Decay, Acne, Tuberculosis and Pneumonia Can Be Killed By This One Seed

Gram positive bacteria, which cause tooth decay, acne, tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Francisella tularensis, and leprosy are all killed by anacardic chemicals present in cashew nuts which are actually seeds.

Cashew nuts are actually the kidney-shaped seeds that adhere to the bottom of the cashew apple, the fruit of the cashew tree, which is native to the coastal areas of northeastern Brazil.

You have probably noticed that cashews in the shell are not available in stores. This is because these nuts are always sold pre-shelled since the interior of their shells contains a caustic resin, known as cashew balm, which must be carefully removed before they are fit for consumption. This caustic resin is actually used in industry to make varnishes and insecticides. Today, the leading commercial producers of cashews are India, Brazil, Mozambique, Tanzania and Nigeria.

Cashews are an excellent source of copper, and a good source of phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, and zinc.

Not only do cashews have a lower fat content than most other nuts, approximately 82% of their fat is unsaturated fatty acids, plus about 66% of this unsaturated fatty acid content are heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, similar to those found in olive oil. Studies of diabetic patients show that monounsaturated fat, when added to a low-fat diet, can help to reduce high triglyceride levels. Triglycerides are a form in which fats are carried in the blood, and high triglyceride levels are associated with an increased risk for heart disease, so ensuring you have some monounsaturated fats in your diet by enjoying cashews is a good idea, especially for persons with diabetes.

Destroys Gram Positive Bacteria

One of the most incredible compounds in cashew nuts are anacardic acids which kill gram positive bacteria responsible for causing tooth decay, acne, tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Francisella tularensis, and leprosy. A solution of one part anacardic acid to 200,000 parts water to as low as one part in 2,000,000 is actually lethal to Gram positive bacteria in 15 minutes.

Cashew nut-shell liquid and the contained anacardic acids have also been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-Helicobacter pylori and antitumor properties. This means it has the tools to defeat both cancer and many types of ulcers in the gut. Despite these known effects; there are hardly any published reports on many of these protective effects, especially the gastroprotection afforded principally through its antioxidant mechanisms.

Writing in Nature’s British Journal of Cancer, a team behind a recent analysis reported that consumption of nuts – including cashew nuts was found to be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, independent of other potential risk factors for pancreatic cancer.
Help Prevent Gallstones Twenty years of dietary data collected on 80,000 women from the Nurses’ Health Study shows that women who eat least 1 ounce of cashew nuts each week have a 25% lower risk of developing gallstones. Since 1 ounce is only 28.6 nuts or about 2 tablespoons of nut butter, preventing gallbladder disease may be as easy as having a handful of cashews as an afternoon pick me up, or tossing some cashews on your oatmeal or salad.

Eating Nuts Lowers Risk of Weight Gain

Although cashew nuts are known to provide a variety of cardio-protective benefits, many avoid them for fear of weight gain. A prospective study published in the journal Obesity shows such fears are groundless. In fact, people who eat nuts at least twice a week are much less likely to gain weight than those who almost never eat nuts.

The 28-month study involving 8,865 adult men and women in Spain, found that participants who ate nuts at least two times per week were 31% less likely to gain weight than were participants who never or almost never ate nuts.

And, among the study participants who gained weight, those who never or almost never ate nuts gained more (an average of 424 g more) than those who ate nuts at least twice weekly.

Study authors concluded, “Frequent nut consumption was associated with a reduced risk of weight gain (5 kg or more). These results support the recommendation of nut consumption as an important component of a cardioprotective diet and also allay fears of possible weight gain.”

Practical Tip: Don’t let concerns about gaining weight prevent you from enjoying the delicious taste and many health benefits of nuts!

Sources:
springer.com
nutfruit.org
whfoods.com
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Natasha Longo has a master’s degree in nutrition and is a certified fitness and nutritional counselor. She has consulted on public health policy and procurement in Canada, Australia, Spain, Ireland, England and Germany.

 

http://preventdisease.com/news/14/042714-Bacteria-That-Causes-Tooth-Decay-Acne-Tuberculosis-and-Pneumonia-Can-Be-Killed-By-This-One-Seed.shtml

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Black Seed – ‘The Remedy For Everything But Death’

Black Seed - 'The Remedy For Everything But Death'

This humble, but immensely powerful seed, kills MRSA, heals the chemical weapon poisoned body, stimulates regeneration of the dying beta cells within the diabetic’s pancreas, and yet too few even know it exists.

The seeds of the annual flowering plant, Nigella Sativa, have been prized for their healing properties since time immemorial.  While frequently referred to among English-speaking cultures as Roman coriander, black sesame, black cumin, black caraway and onion seed, it is known today primarily as black seed, which is at the very least an accurate description of its physical appearance.    (more…)

Eating “Bugs” is a Good Idea

Dear Pharmacist,

You’re sort of obsessed with gut health because you frequently suggest probiotics to people seeking better health. I don’t take probiotics but I do appreciate your perspective. Not one of 14 doctors over six years has ever suggested probiotics. What’s the big deal?  –R.M., Ocala, Florida (more…)

Advice for Ulcers and H. Pylori Infection

 

Suzy-Cohen-1_2Dear Pharmacist,
I took the stool test you recommended called “GI Effects” by Metametrix Labs, and it’s positive for high levels of a bacteria called H. Pylori. My doctor is treating me aggressively since it causes ulcers and stomach cancer. I’m so glad you recommended this test, it sheds light on all my symptoms.! What natural supplements can help?  –S.N., Gainesville, Florida (more…)

Caprylic Acid Helpful for Candida and Bacterial Biofilms

Caprylic acid is a medium chain fatty acid that is not toxic to humans; in fact it can be broken down and used to make energy if needed. This same fatty acid is extremely damaging to nasty gangs of Candida and bacteria, making it a safe way to help boost your immune response. (more…)

Cranberry Health Research Summary

Fact Sheet

Since 1984, many studies have confirmed that cranberries have numerous health benefits, the foremost being its “anti-adhesion” effect on certain bacteria. Cranberry juice cocktail contains proanthocyanidins, more commonly known as condensed tannins, which actually “disable” certain harmful bacteria that cause infection in the body, so the “bugs don’t stick.” (more…)

How A Healthy Gut Makes A Healthy You

When you think about it there are so many ways we use the word gut.

We use our “gut” to describe a lot of the things we feel. You need to have guts to try something new… you can bust a gut laughing… your gut tells you when something is right.

We are learning that there may be more reason to use the word in these ways than we knew.

For example, a brand new study finds that your “gut” may control your organs.

What happens in your gut appears to activate your liver, and benefit your kidneys, colon, digestive tract, blood plasma, metabolism and reproductive system.

More on the study in a minute, but first, let me explain what makes this possible…

Feeling the Flora Connection (more…)

Treat ulcers with probiotics, not antibiotics

Ulcers caused by the Helicobacter pylori bacterial strain may be more effectively treated by beneficial probiotics rather than by conventional antibiotics, according to a new study published in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Researchers from Spain say that probiotic strains like Bifidobacterium have an incredible success rate in fighting inflammatory bowel diseases like ulcers.

The team conducted tests on the effectiveness of several unique strains of bifidobacteria in treating H. pylori and found that one particular strain, Bifidobacterium bifidum CECT 7366, protected against infection roughly 95 percent of the time.

H. pylori is considered one of the major risk factors underlying the development of gastritis and gastric and duodenal ulcers,” say the authors. “Currently, antibiotic-based treatment for H. pylori infection is neither sufficient nor satisfactory, with the most successful treatments reaching 70 to 90 percent eradication rates. The use of probiotics is a potentially promising tool to prevent H. pylori.”

Long-term administration of probiotics in test mice also proved beneficial in preventing the development of ulcers. It helped actually reverse the damage to gastric tissue caused by ulcers, suggesting that healthy individuals can help maintain intestinal health — even when no noticeable disease is present — through probiotic supplementation.

“The results presented here confer to strain B. bifidum CECT 7366 the status of a probiotic bacterium with functional activity against H. pylori,” added the researchers, noting that further trials are needed on humans to verify their findings.

A similar study out of the University of Alberta found that supplementation with a probiotic mix containing 3,600 billion bacteria for six weeks helped more than 50 percent of study participants heal their inflammatory bowel disease, and another 24 percent greatly improve their condition (http://www.naturalnews.com/030077_u…).

Editor’s Note: NaturalNews is strongly against the use of all forms of animal testing. We fully support implementation of humane medical experimentation that promotes the health and well-being of all living creatures.

Sources for this story include:

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_relea…

Wednesday, March 02, 2011 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer