Low Iron Linked with Muscle Health, Sleep Disorders, Mood, Stroke Risk, and Mitochondria

Do you have iron deficiency and not know it? Fatigue, weakness, and cold intolerance are common symptoms of low iron. Standard blood tests may not reflect early iron deficiency. There is, however, a special lab test that tells you how good your iron stores are even before extensive changes occur. This lab test is called serum ferritin. Serum ferritin levels reflect the actual amount of iron stores in the body. A depletion of iron stores indicates a functional deficiency and early iron deficiency, which can cause a variety of health disorders. There is more to low serum ferritin and iron deficiency than meets the eye.

Symptoms of Iron Deficiency

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How Heavy Metals Are Promoting Aging

It’s been known for decades that some metals, including iron, accumulate in human tissues during aging and that toxic levels of iron have been linked to neurologic diseases, such as Parkinson’s. The fact is that all metals are toxic and the aging and diseases processes run wild without special transport and handling mechanisms to keep them from harming us. This applies just as much as essential minerals, like iron, zinc and chromium, as it does to non-essential metals and metalloids, like cadmium and arsenical compounds.

Metals can directly and indirectly damage DNA and that means an increased risk of cancer (we call this genotoxicity). There are also possibly non-genotoxic pathways, due to irritation or immuno-toxicity. (more…)

10 Reasons You Should Be Eating Olives

Even though more attention is usually given to their delicious oil than the whole food itself, olives are one of the world’s most widely enjoyed fruits. Yes, they are fruits even though most of us think of them as zesty vegetables. Here are 10 reasons why you should be eating these little delicacies every day.

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1. Cardiovascular Benefits
When free radicals oxidize cholesterol, blood vessels are damaged and fat builds up in arteries, possibly leading to a heart attack. The antioxidant nutrients in black olives impede this oxidation of cholesterol, thereby helping to prevent heart disease. Olives do contain fat, but it’s the healthy monounsaturated kind, which has been found to shrink the risk of atherosclerosis and increase good cholesterol. When diets low in monounsaturated fat are altered to increase the monounsaturated fat content (without becoming too high in total fat), research study participants typically experience a decrease in their blood cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and LDL:HDL ratio. All of these changes lower our risk of heart disease. (more…)

8 Critical Nutrients Lacking In More Than 70 Percent of Diets

While we all pay attention to incorporating vitamins and minerals into our diets, are you getting enough critical nutrients? There are some nutrients that you need to pay special attention to — ones you probably aren’t getting enough of, yet they’re essential to primary cell functions. Here are seven critical nutrients which are depleted in more than 70 percent of diets.

1. ZINC
Two billion people may have a zinc deficiency, yet it’s an essential mineral required by the body for maintaining a sense of smell, keeping a healthy immune system, building proteins, triggering enzymes, and creating DNA. Zinc also helps the cells in your body communicate by functioning as a neurotransmitter. A deficiency in zinc can lead to stunted growth, diarrhea, impotence, hair loss, eye and skin lesions, impaired appetite, and depressed immunity. (more…)

Stunning Discoveries Regarding Iron, Obesity, Candida & Thyroid

The information contained in this groundbreaking article applies to at least 75 percent of people who are struggling to lose weight.  It is a major factor contributing to the fatigue associated with being overweight and having symptoms of hypothyroid.  It involves new discoveries regarding iron metabolism and explains why even if you eat plenty of iron you may still have rather dramatic iron deficiency issues, which handicap your metabolism and thyroid function.  (more…)

Are You Getting Enough Iron?

(Health Secrets Newsletter) Do you often feel run down, tired, lethargic, dizzy, depressed, or low in energy? You may be short on iron and not getting enough from your diet. This is particularly true for women, since they do not traditionally choose foods that are naturally high in iron. Although the official statistics say only one woman in five of reproductive age is short on iron, many more have a sub-clinical deficiency that impacts their daily life and health. This group includes the reproductive as well as older women.
Why is it important to get enough iron? Iron is required for several key functions in the body including:
  • Oxygen transport in the blood and muscles.
  • Releasing of energy from cells
  • Red blood cell production
  • Immune system health (more…)

Linking Thyroid Problems, Anemia, Fatigue, and Loss of Cognitive Ability

The loss of cognitive function as one grows older along with the loss of efficient thyroid function is a common occurrence.  This means that optimizing thyroid function is one key factor that will contribute to better mental and cognitive skills.  New science is now revealing that the condition of your red blood cells is an early predictor of thyroid function, a point that is worth taking a few minutes to understand. (more…)

Iron Status Related to Body Fat

According to a recently published study, iron levels are associated with the amount of body fat in adolescents. Iron plays a role in several important physiological functions, including carrying oxygen throughout the body bound to hemoglobin in red blood cells. Free iron is transported in the blood by the protein transferrin. The most specific indicator of iron status is transferrin saturation, which is the ratio of serum iron and total iron-binding capacity, multiplied by 100. Iron status is also measured by hemoglobin concentration, as iron levels can influence hemoglobin synthesis. Ferritin is a measurement of stored iron. (more…)

7 Reasons Kale Is the New Beef

Like the saying goes, the only constant is change. We may resist it all we want, but Time and its inevitable evolution of everything in its path is unaffected by our attempts to stop it. The resulting trajectory of humanity’s nascent ascent appears to be positioning itself to sweep us into progressive new times, especially where our food choices are concerned, as nearly 7 billion people are now standing on the little scraps of land that we share with some 55 billion rather large animals raised for food each year. (As another famous saying goes: This town ain’t big enough for the both of us.) So, beef (and all factory-farmed meat) may be going from rib-eye to relic as we transition to a greener world… literally—as in leafy, green vegetables.

Environmentalists cite meat production as one of the biggest contributors to global warming, and the  USDA ‘s  new food pyramid  suggests the healthiest choice is making vegetables and fruit the biggest part of every meal by reducing consumption of animal proteins. Kale  is far more nutritious than other leafy greens, but these seven reasons why it is such an important futurefood may just surprise you.

1. Anti-inflammatory: Inflammation is the number one cause of arthritis, heart disease and a number of autoimmune diseases, and is triggered by the consumption of animal products. Kale is an incredibly effective anti-inflammatory food, potentially preventing and even reversing these illnesses.

2. Iron: Despite the myth that vegetarians are anemic, the number of non-vegetarians with iron-deficiencies is on the rise. Per calorie, kale has more iron than beef.

3. Calcium: Dairy and beef both contain calcium, but the U.S. still has some of the highest rates of bone loss and osteoporosis in the world. Kale contains more calcium per calorie than milk (90 grams per serving) and is also better absorbed by the body than dairy.

4. Fiber: Like protein, fiber is a macronutrient, which means we need it every day. But many Americans don’t eat nearly enough and the deficiency is linked to heart disease, digestive disorders and cancer. Protein-rich foods, like meat, contain little to no fiber. One serving of kale not only contains 5 percent of the recommended daily intake of fiber, but it also provides 2 grams of protein.

5. Omega fatty acids: Essential Omega fats play an important role in our health, unlike the saturated fats in meat. A serving of kale contains 121 mg of omega-3 fatty acids and 92.4 mg of omega-6 fatty acids.

6. Immunity: Super-bugs and bacteria are a serious risk to our health. Many of these come as a result of factory farm meat, eggs and dairy products. Kale is an incredibly rich source of immune-boosting carotenoid and flavanoid antioxidants including vitamins A and C.

7. Sustainable: Kale grows to maturity in 55 to 60 days versus a cow raised for beef for an average of 18-24 months. Kale can grow in most climates and is relatively easy and low impact to grow at home or on a farm. To raise one pound of beef requires 16 pounds of grain, 11 times as much fossil fuel and more than 2,400 gallons of water.

Article first appeared on organic authority website.

Sources:

http://www.peta.org/issues/animals-used-for-food/meat-wastes-natural-resources.aspx

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2461/2

http://www.irondisorders.org/iron-deficiency-anemia

http://www.ellenskitchen.com/faqs/calcium.html

 

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