Top 12 Most Healthy Benefits of Lentils (#11 Really Surprised Us!)

Lentils may be individually small, but they pack one heck of a nutritious punch. They’re full of essential minerals and nutrients like potassium, iron, folate, zinc, and calcium – all of which are important for your body’s well being. And they provide one of the richest sources of dietary fiber on earth. If you haven’t already made lentils a part of your weekly diet plan, here are twelve reasons why you should seriously consider doing so.

The Top 12 Health Benefits of Lentils

1. High in dietary fiber. Here’s a fun lentils nutrition fact: just one cup provides you with 63% of your recommended daily allowance of dietary fiber. They contain both soluble and insoluble fiber — both of which are important for your overall health.

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Top 12 Biggest Lies of Mainstream Nutrition

There is a lot of misinformation circling around in mainstream nutrition

I have listed the worst examples in this article, but unfortunately this is just the tip of the iceberg.

Here are the top 11 biggest lies, myths and misconceptions of mainstream nutrition.

1. Eggs Are Unhealthy

There’s one thing that nutrition professionals have had remarkable success with… and that is demonizing incredibly healthy foods.

The worst example of that is eggs, which happen to contain a large amount of cholesterol and were therefore considered to increase the risk of heart disease.

But recently it has been proven that the cholesterol in the diet doesn’t really raise the cholesterol in blood. In fact, eggs primarily raise the “good” cholesterol and are NOT associated with increased risk of heart disease (1, 2).

What we’re left with is one of the most nutritious foods on the planet. They’re high in all sorts of nutrients along with unique antioxidants that protect our eyes (3).

To top it all of, despite being a “high fat” food, eating eggs for breakfast is proven to cause significant weight loss compared to bagels for breakfast (4, 5).

Bottom Line: Eggs do not cause heart disease and are among the most nutritious foods on the planet. Eggs for breakfast can help you lose weight.

2. Saturated Fat is Bad For You (more…)

Up For Debate: Are All Calories Created Equal?

Measuring Calories
In our never-ending search for effective diets, several weight loss programs have adopted the principle that what really matters is not the foods you eat, but how many calories you actually take in.

In other words, it doesn’t matter if you eat pizza and ice cream or salmon and vegetables. As long as you stay within an allotted number of calories—or certain amount of “points”—allowed per day, you will lose weight. (more…)

Quinoa, A Complete Plant Protein

The days when people worried about combining foods to be sure they got complete protein in every meal are behind us. Experts have concluded that the body can get all the essential amino acids it needs to make protein from foods consumed over a one- to two-day period. [1] But that doesn’t mean you should shy away from complete protein foods, especially when they are low in fat, cholesterol-free and a good source of fiber, vitamins and other important nutrients. Which food can offer all of these healthful characteristics? No, it’s not a meat or dairy product, but a delicious complete plant protein called quinoa. (more…)

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

High blood sugar is bad. Carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Therefore carbohydrates are bad. The theory is simple, and yet incredibly flawed.

The truth is, you can have chronically high blood sugar even while religiously avoiding every starch and sugar in sight. Low-carb forums are littered with posts asking a very relevant question:

Why is my blood sugar so high when I’m not eating any carbs?

The answer is simple, yet often overlooked.

The Hormone that Raises Blood Sugar: No Carbohydrates Required (more…)

5 Foods for a High Protein Vegetarian Diet

Lisa Garber
Waking Times

In today’s McWorld, we often equate protein with a greasy, drippy burger. Protein is, in fact, a matter of amino acids, and it abounds in the plant kingdom. The trick is in knowing where to find it, knowledge that is especially needed be vegans and vegetarians. RDA recommendations for protein are from 0.36 to 0.45 grams per pound of body weight a day. That’s only 15 to 20% of calories—an amount easily attainable when including these foods for a high protein vegetarian diet.

High Protein Vegetarian Diet – 1. Dairy Products and Eggs (more…)

Low Carbohydrate Dieters: Beware of High Protein Intake

Most of us have heard something about low carb dieting. Whether it is the Atkins Diet or the Paleo Diet, carbohydrate restriction is becoming more popular as more people experience dramatic weight loss.

While restricting carbohydrate intake does offer several health benefits, there are also dangers involved with eating too much protein. (more…)

The Truth About Protein

The other day I was reminiscing about the long swim I completed for charity.   I also remember the nutrition and the first experience I had with supplementation.

I remember the day clearly.  I had gone into a local nutrition and health supplement store, looking for the best whey protein supplement.  I remember walking to the back and being completely overwhelmed by the amount of protein powder.  I had no idea if I needed high carb, low carb, muscle builder, or soy.  There were too many to choose from.  (more…)