Cell phone use found to affect the glucose metabolism of the brain

Does using a cell phone have an effect on the brain? According to a 2011 study titled “Effects of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Signal Exposure on Brain Glucose Metabolism,” the answer is absolutely. The study, headed by Nora D. Volkow, M.D. and conducted by the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, examined the effect of cell phone use on the brain by utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) on 47 participants. (more…)

Cell phone use visibly alters brain cell activity, study finds

A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has found that the radio frequency waves emitted from mobile phones demonstrably alter brain wave activity. The findings lend credence to previous studies that have suggested long-term use of such devices may be implicated in causing brain cancer. (more…)

Cordyceps, the Medicinal Mushroom Superfood

Alfredo is a 60-year old sport cyclist who rides his bike 200 miles a week. Yet, he finds his endurance declining over the past few years. He finds he lags behind on trips and is no longer able to keep up with the younger guys in his group. Alfredo’s friend suggested a visit to my office to find the problem.

Alfredo was sent to the lab for a complete evaluation including a testosterone level. The results showed his testosterone level was actually quite good, so instead, I instead suggested an energy super food called Cordyceps Sinensis. He agreed to try it, and two weeks later, an amazed Alfredo reported his endurance has improved and he is riding faster and farther than before, thanks to the Cordyceps. Rather than lagging behind, he is now the leader of the pack.  (more…)

Repeat MRI screening for breast cancer results in fewer false positives

MRI screening for breast cancer delivers consistent rates of cancer detection and fewer false-positive results over time, according to a new study published online and in the April print edition of Radiology (see also Breast Cancer).

While MRI can be more effective than mammography at identifying suspicious areas of the breast, it is not always able to distinguish between cancerous and benign lesions, which can result in additional testing and false-positive results that may cause anxiety for patients. A screening exam is considered to be false positive when its results recommend further testing or a biopsy of a suspicious finding, but no cancer is found.

“MRI is an excellent screening tool for breast cancer, but the higher rate of false-positive results keeps some women from undergoing the exam,” said the study’s co-author Martha B. Mainiero, M.D., director of the Anne C. Pappas Center for Breast Imaging at Rhode Island Hospital and associate professor of diagnostic imaging at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, R.I. “The goal of our study was to determine if the availability of prior MR images for comparison reduces the rate of false positives associated with the initial MRI breast screening exam.”

In the study, researchers reviewed reports from 650 consecutive screening MRI breast exams performed on women between September 2007 and December 2008 at Rhode Island Hospital. The women, who ranged in age from 25 to 81 years, were referred for MRI screening because they were considered to be at high risk for breast cancer.

Of the breast MRI results reviewed, 307 were the patient’s first, or baseline, screening exams and 343 were annual or repeat screening MRI exams.

In the baseline group, MRI identified two cancers for a cancer detection rate of 0.65 percent. In the repeat screening group, the cancer detection rate was nearly twice as high: cancer was found in four patients, for a rate of 1.17 percent.

Women undergoing a baseline exam were nearly four times more likely to be recommended for a follow-up MRI exam in six months to monitor suspicious findings (31 of 307 women, or 10.1 percent) than patients who had one or more prior MRI exams for comparison (9 of 343 women or 2.6 percent). The rate of false-positive results was 13 percent (39 of 299 patients) in the baseline exam group and 5.6 percent (19 of 341 patients) in the annual exam group.

“False positives are a risk of the breast MRI procedure, but the rate decreases following the initial round of screening,” Dr. Mainiero said. “This information should provide reassurance for high-risk patients who are considering undergoing annual MRI screening exams.”

 

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