Magnesium Lowers Colorectal Cancer Risk

Magnesium Lowers Colorectal Cancer Risk

An astounding 70% or more of Americans are deficient in the essential mineral magnesium.  Low levels can have deadly effects.

Epidemiologic studies have suggested that low magnesium may be associated with higher rates of colorectal cancer among other diseases.  Now a meta-analysis confirms that higher magnesium intakes are associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer and especially colon cancer.

Researchers from Soochow University in China analyzed eight prospective studies covering 338,979 participants. Their results, published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found the highest average intake of magnesium was associated with an 11% reduction in colorectal cancer risk compared to the lowest average intake.

In addition, the researchers found that for every 50 mg per day increase in magnesium, colon cancer was reduced by 7%.

The results are consistent with an earlier meta-analysis by Imperial College London and Wageningen University finding for every 100 mg increase in magnesium, colorectal cancer decreased by 13%.

Unfortunately, only about 20% of Americans get the recommended daily magnesium intake of 420 mg for men or 320 mg for women.  And a deficiency can be debilitating.

Magnesium participates in over 300 known biochemical reactions in your body.  Recent research from the human genome project reveals that 3,751 human proteins have binding sites for magnesium.

Magnesium supports harmonious flow within various body systems.  Without it things get stuck.  This can show up as constipation and other digestive problems, irregularities in menstrual flow and reproductive health, muscle spasms, nocturnal leg cramps, and migraine headaches.

The health benefits of magnesium are far greater than previously imagined.  This one essential mineral keeps your heart rhythm steady…promotes normal blood pressure…helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function…supports a healthy immune system…regulates blood sugar…and keeps your memory strong.

It’s not difficult to boost magnesium levels with whole foods.  One of the richest sources of magnesium is high quality chocolate. Dark chocolate has a whopping 176 mg of magnesium in a 3.5 ounce bar.  In fact, if you crave chocolate your body may be telling you it’s low in magnesium.

Other high magnesium foods include:

  • Dried seaweeds
  • Dark leafy greens (especially spinach and Swiss chard)
  • Broccoli
  • Beans
  • Whole grains (especially brown rice and quinoa)
  • Almonds, cashews, and filberts
  • Sesame seeds
  • Lentils
  • Avocados
  • Spirulina and chlorella

Visit GreenMedInfo’s page on magnesium documenting well over 100 health benefits of magnesium.

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Spinach influences gene expression to cut colon cancer risk in half

Colorectal cancers represent the fourth most prevalent form of the disease with more than 150,000 cases diagnosed each year and more than 50,000 deaths. Forward-thinking nutrition researchers understand that this particular form of the disease is largely preventable through lifestyle changes including healthy diet, exercise and smoking cessation. The newly emerging science of Epigenetics is shining a light on the specific mechanism of food-based nutrients to influence genetic expression helping to prevent many diseases, especially colon cancer. (more…)

Dear Mark: Do Perfect Foods Exist?

perfectfoodToday’s Dear Mark post touches on a concept that many of us have pondered: the perfect food. That is, does such a thing even exist? What with phytates, lectins, easily-absorbed fat-soluble vitamins, allergenic proteins, and all the rest, it sometimes seems like every good food has a crippling downside. If you read too many health and nutrition blogs that delve into these relatively arcane topics (my own not necessarily excluded!), it often feels like you can’t eat anything at all without risking some horrible illness, deficiency, or excess. (more…)

Five Supplements for Phase Two Nutrition

(Health Secrets Newsletter) There is no getting around it: a best quality, plant sourced multivitamin like Daily Balance is the first step for anyone making the decision to take charge of his or her health. Multivitamins like Daily Balance provide a broad spectrum of minerals in quantified amounts as well as cofactors that aid absorption and help alkalinize the body. Daily Balance provides a solid nutritional foundation on which to build. It’s an easy one-decision beginning. But once that decision is made, discovering what to do next to take your revitalization to another level is not nearly so clear. (more…)

Popeye was right: Spinach really boosts muscles

Just about anyone who harks back a few decades is familiar with the famed cartoon character Popeye the Sailor Man, who downed a can of spinach to produce bulging muscles whenever he needed to get out of trouble. Now researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden found have discovered that Popeye was right – spinach really can boost muscles. (more…)

Why Spinach Salad is a Great Idea

Popeye was the poster boy for spinach. He could swallow down a can of it and be able to knock out Bluto who was twice his size. Popeye was probably pretty healthy too, avoiding the pitfalls of aging and disease that come from a diet lacking in flavonoids and other nutrients found in spinach. Look what spinach can do for you.

Spinach gives a knock out punch to cancer
Scientists in Japan studied some of the glyconutrients from spinach and found they inhibited destruction of DNA, cancer cell growth, and tumor growth. They used the nutrients to suppress the growth of colon adenocarcinoma in mice. After a two week period of ingesting the nutrients, a 56.1% decrease in solid tumor volume occurred without any side effects.  And the nutrients reduced the ability of tumors to supply themselves with blood which they need to fuel their growth. Markers of cell proliferation were drastically reduced. (Lipids, August, 2008)
Spinach is good for combating ovarian cancer too. A recently released study from the Harvard Medical School evaluated the association between dietary flavonoid intake and ovarian cancer risk. Of all the flavonoids they tested, apigenin, found in spinach as well as parsley and celery, showed the highest correlation. (International Journal of Cancer, April,2010) (more…)

How to increase Iron in your diet

When people think of iron, they probably think about steel products that iron is used in, things like metal flag poles and construction beams. Sometimes they`ll think instead of wrought iron, often used ornamentally, such as in fences. Iron is also an important element of a person`s diet, and just as it makes strong constructed products, it helps a person remain strong and healthy.
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