Study: Vegetable Oils Contribute to Fatty Liver Disease – Saturated Fats Do Not

traditional-fats-coconut-oil-butter-refined-canola-soybean-corn

Traditional fats such as coconut oil and butter are high in saturated fats. Modern processed cooking oil such as corn and soybean oil, the new vegetable oils that are polyunsaturated, have only been in the food chain since World War II, and contain dangerous trans fatty acids.

by Paul Fassa
Health Impact News

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly becoming an international epidemic. The mainstream medical mantra for its underlying cause is “fat consumption.”

However, “fat” is a very general term and does not distinguish between traditional healthy fats and unhealthy modern processed fats and oils. The common belief is that saturated fat is the culprit in fatty liver disease, but a new study published in the July 4, 2017 European Journal of Nutrition comes to a different conclusion.

This peer reviewed study, “Chronic consumption of fructose in combination with trans fatty acids but not with saturated fatty acids induces nonalcoholic steatohepatitis with fibrosis in rats,” examined more closely the effects of trans fatty acids (from vegetable oils derived from corn and soybeans) versus saturated fats, found in traditional fats such as butter, coconut oil, and palm oil.

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is basically advanced NAFLD. It has its own acronym, NASH. The word steatohepatitis combines steato, Greek for fat, and hepatitis, liver inflammation. The fat accumulation led to liver inflammation with NASH worsening one’s liver health and leading to cirrhosis of the liver and potential death.

The study’s title gives away their conclusion: fructose is bad for the liver, but it is worse with trans fats than it is with saturated fats.

Discussing the Study’s Findings (more…)

Why You Should NEVER Eat Vegetable Oil or Margarine!

Aside from “healthy whole grains,” vegetable oils and margarine are some of the most misunderstood and over-recommended foods in the health community. You’ve probably heard these referred to as “heart healthy oils,” a good alternative to those “artery clogging saturated fats.”

These oils are supposed to help lower cholesterol and blood pressure, increase weight loss and somehow improve overall health.

Only one problem…. again, science doesn’t back these claims up!

notbutter butteritsnot Why You Should NEVER Eat Vegetable Oil or Margarine!

What Are Vegetable Oils /Margarine?

Vegetable oils (and margarine, made from these oils) are oils extracted from seeds like the rapeseed (canola oil) soybean (soybean oil), corn, sunflower, safflower, etc. They were practically non-existent in our diets until the early 1900s when new chemical processes allowed them to be extracted. (more…)

Vegetable oils promote obesity

Soya oil, maiz oil and sunflower oil promotes weight gain. (Photo: Colourbox)

A recent study suggests a close association between dietary omega-6 and the development of overweight and obesity. Omega-6 is a type of fat found in certain vegetable oils which is present in large amount in processed and junk food.

New results from experiments using animal models show that a high intake of omega-6 led to overproduction of signalling compounds that stimulate the appetite, with the result that the animals ate more and developed obesity.

“People in the Western world are eating less and less fat, but at the same time our body weight is increasing, so the type of fats we eat would seem to mean more for developing overweight and obesity than just how much fat we consume,” says NIFES scientist Anita Røyneberg Alvheim. (more…)

Healthy oils suppress Breast Cancer

Women that are on the Breast Cancer journey must be clear about certain dietary restrictions. There is the obvious list of “Foods to Avoid”, such as sugar, processed foods, and hormone injected meats. However, there seems to be a lot of confusion about what types of oils are beneficial for Breast Cancer suppression and which ones should be avoided.

Let’s start with the term HNE, which stands for the fatty acid derived toxin “4-hydroxy-trans-2 nonenal”. It is a byproduct that is produced when polyunsaturated oils are heated at very high temperatures. The oils that are high in linoleic acid are often used in restaurants and in homes for frying or high heat cooking include:
Canola Oil, Soybean Oil, Sunflower Oil and Corn Oil. (more…)

Coconut Oil: You Want a Food Loaded with Real Health Benefits? You Want Coconut Oil

I have already discussed the many toxic effects of the unsaturated oils, and I have frequently mentioned that coconut oil doesn’t have those toxic effects, though it does contain a small amount of the unsaturated oils.

Many people have asked me to write something on coconut oil. I thought I might write a small book on it, but I realize that there are no suitable channels for distributing such a book — if the seed-oil industry can eliminate major corporate food products that have used coconut oil for a hundred years, they certainly have the power to prevent dealers from selling a book that would affect their market more seriously. For the present, I will just outline some of the virtues of coconut oil. (more…)

Fats and Oils Made Simple

Someone recently sent me an article published in Food Navigator about low fat foods and diets. The article, based on an interview with Professor of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, Alice Lichtenstein, espoused the idea that ‘low fat’ is too simplistic a message from a nutritional perspective — and that the way high fat foods are being reformulated is not always appropriate. At first I was excited. After all, I’ve been promoting variations of this concept for several decades now. Unfortunately, barely a paragraph into the article, I could see that the world’s establishment nutrition experts still don’t get it when it comes to fat — and, dare I say, despite the title of the article, still subscribe to a “simplistic” understanding of fat despite their protestations to the contrary.

(more…)